In 1999, the Prevent Cancer Foundation designated March as the National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. The foundation partnered with the American Digestive Health Foundation and the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable to raise awareness and advocate for policy change for the third most common type of cancer in the United States. On November 19, 1999, an official declaration came through from the United States Senate and the House of Representatives. 

With approximately 100,000 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) every year, March is an important month to cast a spotlight on the value of preventative measures such as screening. The American Cancer Society estimates there will be 149,500 new cases of CRC and 52,980 deaths in 2021. In December 1995, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that adults with an average risk of CRC should be screened between the ages of 50-75 years. Due to increasing evidence over the last few decades, in December 2020 the USPSTF released draft recommendations saying screening should start at the age of 45 years.

The COVID-19 pandemic led to a drastic reduction in the number of colonoscopies in 2020: about a 90% drop compared to previous years. Approximately 1.7 million Americans missed their annual screening test in 2020, and 18,800 CRC diagnoses were either delayed or missed altogether. 

In recognition of the month of March, the Colon Cancer Foundation (CCF) had several activities planned, including the #GiveACrap Challenge. The Challenge encouraged individuals to sign up to receive a free Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT), and the chance to receive a special limited-edition beer. People also had the option of making a donation to the foundation to receive the test kit and the beer. Other activities included the CCF Challenge which is a 45-mile walk-run and a concert celebrating the culmination of a week full of activities.

In his proclamation for National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, President Joseph Biden urged Americans to call attention to CRC risk factors and increase annual screening practices. He emphasized that March is the perfect opportunity to improve public understanding of CRC and to educate individuals about the age for proper screening. He reiterated that if caught early, CRC is highly treatable and curable. “Because of the Affordable Care Act, most health insurance plans must cover a set of preventive services with no out-of-pocket cost. This includes colorectal cancer screening in adults aged 50 and older,” President Biden said.

Fight Colorectal Cancer and the Colon Cancer Coalition urged business leaders and landmarks to go blue to spread CRC awareness. As of March 9, 2021, businesses, healthcare systems, and landmarks in 21 states had confirmed their status to “Go Blue” in honor of CRC Awareness Month. Moreover, the Colon Cancer Coalition hosted a ‘Get Your Rear in Gear’ event on March 21, 2021, in-person and virtually, as a 5K untimed run/walk-in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Every year in March, various events take place all throughout the U.S. with the hope of spreading awareness and advocating for CRC. It is essential to spread the word about CRC and emphasize the importance of regular screening to prevent, manage, and treat CRC.

 

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