Colorectal cancer, which is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, will affect around 1 in 22 men and 1 in 24 women in our lifetime. While there are numerous links between hereditary and lifestyle risks of developing colon cancer, there are still unknown risks with the disease. Recently, researchers in France discovered a new link between onset colorectal cancer.

 

Hôpitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor’s Dr. Iradj Sobhani and the University Paris-Est Créteil conducted research in a mice model that shows the correlation between onset colorectal cancer and the dysbiosis, a sensitive gut microbiota.

 

The study was conducted based on previous research that showed a link between gut microbes and onset colon cancer. The study covered 136 mice, which had stool samples from nine people with sporadic colon cancer or nine people without colon cancer.

 

The mice that had samples from those with sporadic colon cancer had traces of dysbiosis and precancerous lesions. The results of the research prompted the group to develop a non-invasive blood test to screen for dysbiosis.

 

The researchers were able to link their blood test in preliminary studies, but will run larger trials to ensure it can be implemented on a larger scale. The non-invasive blood test is a promising step forward in helping to diagnose those that will develop colon cancer without a predisposed risk factor.

 

Stay up-to-date on other colorectal cancer news and research with the Colon Cancer Foundation blog.

 

Recently, Team Colon Cancer Challenge ran the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon, where they “made their miles count” by raising funds to support the Colon Cancer Foundation. Each member of the team raised at least $3,000 to support colon cancer survivors and patients.

 

According to the American Cancer Society, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is around 1 in 22 for men and 1 in 24 for women. Every member of Team Colon Cancer Challenge helps spread the word that colorectal cancer is preventable, treatable and beatable with early screening. The Colon Cancer Foundation launched Team Colon Cancer Challenge in 2010 and has raised over $500,000 in support of efforts to raise awareness of colon cancer.

 

The 2019 Team Colon Cancer Challenge New York Marathon runners have currently raised over $100,000! Thank you and congratulations to all of the Team Colon Cancer team members:

 

Ross Drever

Claudia and Chelsea Lee Hammerschmidt

Michael Murray

Anthony Sandeen

Michael Hicks

Anthony Gollan

Patricia Crisafulli

Nanette Nelson

Elizabeth Barth

Stephanie Moore

Kate Griffin

Ana Bisciello

Ty Senour

Samantha Tritt

Gary Killion

Sam Fairall-Lee

Young-Eun Choi

John Toigo

Chris Scolavino

Ryan Gibbs

Jake Quiat

Allison Gibbs

Samantha Ahearn

Chris Berg

Nic Crider

 

For more information on joining Team Colon Cancer Challenge for the 50th anniversary of the New York Marathon in 2020, please visit https://www.coloncancerfoundation.org/events/ or contact us at info@coloncancerfoundation.org.

 

Sun lovers rejoice: recent studies show that vitamin D may slow down colorectal cancer growth. A new trial called SUNSHINE, conducted at 11 United States academic and community cancer centers, showed positive results for patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

In the study, two groups of 139 participants with advanced colorectal cancer took either a high-dose or low-dose of vitamin D3in combination with their chemotherapy treatments. In the high-dose group, the disease progression stopped for 13 months on average. In the low-dose group, the disease progression stopped for 11 months on average.

Perhaps most impressively, the study showed that high-dose group participants were less likely to have disease progression or death in their almost two-year follow-up period.

Before you jump into the sun, there are a few things to understand about vitamin D. The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health estimates that 1 billion humans worldwide have a vitamin D deficiency. If you live north of the line that connects Philadelphia to San Francisco, chances are you may not get enough vitamin D in through the sun. Additionally, you would need to walk outside for 15 minutes a day to get the necessary amount. The best way for most people to get an adequate dose of vitamin D is through a supplement. Talk to your health care provider if you think that you should add more vitamin D into your diet.

While a larger trial is required to confirm that vitamin D may slow colorectal cancer growth, this is exciting news for families who are impacted by this deadly cancer. As the second-deadliest cancer in the United States, the chance of vitamin D playing a role in reducing disease progression in cancer patients is optimistic.

Learn more about the facts regarding colorectal cancer and what puts you at risk.

 

 

 

 

The Colon Cancer Foundation is pleased to announce Dr. Jenny Lazarus as a recipient of the 2019 Colorectal Cancer Research Scholar Award. Dr. Lazarus currently focuses on immune therapy, combined with looking at colon cancer at a microscopic level to understand how the cancer cells interact with other cells. She will join the Colon Cancer Foundation at the Colorectal Cancer Research Scholar Award Presentation this year. Read our interview to learn more about Dr. Lazarus and her role in colorectal cancer research.

Tell us about your background.

I am from a small town in the mountains of Northern California. I received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California at Davis in Classical Civilizations with an emphasis on Latin poetry and Roman art. I completed my Medical Degree from Ross University in Dominica, West Indies. I have traveled to many places in my life and my ultimate goals are a cure for cancer and relief to pain and suffering in the world.

What made you interested in colon cancer research?

Colon cancer has afflicted many people and although we have made improvements, a large group of people are still suffering.

Tell us about your past work and research efforts in the past and its significance to colon cancer.

My past work as a surgeon in training at Texas Tech Health Science Center in Lubbock Texas, where I will return to finish my training this July, has and will prepare me to treat individuals who have colon cancer surgically. My research efforts at the University of Michigan have focused on patients who have colon cancer that has spread to other organs where surgery is no longer a cure.

When did you first know that you wanted to work in surgery, and why were you so passionate about that?

During my third year of surgical training, I was involved in the care of a child that was diagnosed with cancer that was not able to be cured by surgery alone. We employed the help of other physicians who were research scientists for the care of the child. That experience helped refine my focus into pursuing a career where I could not only alleviate suffering with surgery but also investigate the cancer itself to further enhance the life of the patients where surgery alone was not a cure.

Describe the current colorectal cancer research you are conducting.

Immune therapy is currently used to treat a small subset of patients with colon cancer. In this small group of people, the tumor itself is unique and the treatment is effective often giving patients a cure. We are looking at colon cancer at a microscopic level to understand how the cancer cells are interacting with other cells. Understanding the immune cells in the tumor is just as important as understanding the cancer cells in determining how immune therapy works on specific individuals and not others. We are currently investigating the interactions between these cells. In doing so, we see patterns emerging in different patients with colon cancer. Each patient has a different pattern of cell types and some patients have similar patterns to each other. We found that patients who share a particular pattern of cells in the tumor are likely to benefit from immune therapy thus increasing the number of people who can receive and benefit from its treatment.

What is your mission and goals in the current work that you are doing?

My primary overall mission is to cure colon cancer. Although a daunting task, I believe it is possible. The cohesive and dynamic team in the Department of Surgery at the University of Michigan has brought together many individual’s research strengths into one collaborative unit where thoughts, ideas, and expertise can meld together for the improvement of the lives of patients. Our goals are to develop new ways of analyzing tumor cells and their interactions with other cells as well as increasing the collaborative environment with other physicians and surgeons to better the quality of patient’s lives.

What are your goals for your future?

I will finish surgical training at Texas Tech Health Science Center in Lubbock Texas and pursue a career in academic research as a surgeon-scientist. I have learned the importance of a team approach, a model I will take with me and employ when I establish a laboratory in the future. I plan to focus on innovative surgical and research techniques as well as foster a rich collaborative environment with not only other physicians and researchers but also foundations and the community to bring information and new treatments to patients as quickly as possible.

What would a colorectal cancer breakthrough mean for millions of people?

I do think we are close to a breakthrough! We were ecstatic to discover the possibility of another group of individuals with colon cancer that may very well benefit from immune therapy which is already being used in a smaller group of people. A breakthrough for a cure would not only impact people who have cancer, but also their friends, family members and co-workers. We are all connected in one way or another and any impact on the health and prosperity of even one person can influence the world.

Why is it so important that we all support research conducted in the field of colon cancer treatment and prevention?

As surgeons, we are able to help people immediately by removing colon cancer itself, this can alleviate pain, stop the cancer from spreading, and for many people this is a cure. Sometimes however when someone has surgery, colon cancer can come back. In addition, some people learn they have cancer after the colon cancer has already spread. In these cases research is the future hope for a cure. Individuals and foundations like the Colon Cancer Challenge Foundation are vital for a cure. Funding for research is scarce not only for researchers themselves but for the equipment and resources needed for study. Support from the community is vital to a future cure.

How has the 2019 Colorectal Cancer Research Scholar Award changed your life?

This award really has confirmed the focus of my career. I feel supported in the research I am conducting but also feel supported as a researcher, this has propelled my energy and focus toward my future goals in knowing that the community supports not only my research but myself as a surgeon-scientist.

 

The Colon Cancer Foundation would like to thank all of our volunteers for their hard work and donations to make the 2019 Colorectal Cancer Research Scholar Award possible. Learn how you support Dr. Lazarus and work toward a cure for colorectal cancer at our website.