Colorectal cancer, commonly known as colon cancer, is one of the world’s deadliest cancers. However, there is a lot of confusion about the disease. Know the facts about colorectal cancer and what puts you at risk.

 

What is colorectal cancer?

Colorectal cancer occurs where there are abnormal cells that divide and survive within your color or the rectum. According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer often starts as a noncancerous growth, called a polyp. The most common type is an adenomatous polyp, also known as an adenoma. While one-third of people can expect to develop at least one adenoma, only 10 percent are estimated to turn into cancer. The chance that the adenoma becomes cancerous increases as it gets bigger.

 

How likely am I to get colorectal cancer?

In 2019, there will be around 101,420 new cases of colon cancer and 44,180 new cases of rectal cancer. Right now, your lifetime odds of developing colorectal cancer is 1 in 22 for men and 1 in 24 for women. However, there are various other factors that will affect your likeliness to develop the disease. The American Cancer Society predicts that there are over one million colorectal cancer survivors today.

 

Why are men more likely to get colorectal cancer than women?

Colorectal cancer is 30 percent more likely to occur in men than women. Risk factors, such as likeliness to smoke cigarettes and hormones, play a large role in making cancer more prominent in men. According to studies from the American Cancer Society, the median age for colon cancer diagnoses in men is 68-years-old and for women is 72-years-old. The median age for colon cancer diagnoses for both men and women is 63-years-old.

 

What is the survival rate for colorectal cancer?

Luckily, deaths related to colorectal cancer are decreasing due to earlier screening and advanced technology. According to the American Cancer Society, the relative survival rate for colorectal cancer is at 65 percent at five years after diagnoses and 58 percent at 10 years after diagnoses. One way to increase your chance of fighting this deadly disease is to follow the screening guidelines and pay attention to early warning signs of colorectal cancer.[1]

Learn more about colorectal cancer through our other blogs and get involved with the Colon Cancer Foundation to help us support colorectal cancer survivors and their families.

 

This month, honor the thousands of colon cancer patients, survivors, and champions by spreading awareness regarding colorectal cancer during Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Since 2000, the colorectal cancer community has mobilized during the month of March to raise awareness, increase education and convince loved ones to get screened. There are multiple ways to get involved during Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, starting with learning more about colorectal cancer.

Get educated about colorectal cancer

While colorectal cancer in adults over 50-years-old has declined, colorectal cancer is on the rise among younger generations. Today, even teenagers are being diagnosed at alarmingly greater rates. Around 13,500 people under the age of 50 will become diagnosed with colon cancer. One of the largest issues that screenings do no begin until 50, so these diagnoses will often become late-stage diagnoses. Make sure to have the conversation about colorectal cancer with your loved ones and your doctors earlier than later.

Wear blue to show your support

March 1 is officially Dress in Blue Day, but you can wear blue all month long to show support for colorectal cancer survivors and patients. Encourage your workplace and friends to wear blue to get the conversation about colorectal cancer started. Make sure to post to social media and tag the Colon Cancer Foundation on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Participate in the 16th Annual Colon Cancer Challenge

Join us for the 16th Annual Colon Cancer Challenge on March 24 to show support for those with colorectal cancer and raise funds for the Colon Cancer Challenge Foundation. We are ecstatic to host the challenge this year at the Icahn Stadium on Randall’s Island. In 2018, an estimated 135,000 Americans were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. If caught early enough, the five-year survival rate is 90 percent. With the 16th Annual Colon Cancer Challenge, we can work together to reduce these fatalities. Whether you participate in the 5K or spearhead fundraising efforts among your friends, you are helping the Colon Cancer Foundation to improve the life of current patients, survivors and future patients of this deadly disease. No matter what distance you cover, you will make up ground in the race to prevent colorectal cancer.

Whether you choose to dress in blue or attend the 16th Annual Colon Cancer Challenge — we hope you do both — make sure to show your support during Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Even after the month of March, you can help us fight colorectal cancer with the “Eighty by 2018.” Take the pledge to get screened,  choose a healthy way of eating and lead a  physically active life.

The Colon Cancer Foundation is excited to announce the 16th Anniversary of the Colon Cancer Challenge. This year, we will return to Icahn Stadium on Randall’s Island to work together to educate about colorectal cancer and support those who are affected by its debilitating effects. Join the rest of the colorectal cancer community on March 24, 2019, to support the Colon Cancer Foundation’s initiatives.

 

What Is the 2019 Colon Cancer Challenge and Why Should I Join?

 

In 2004 Dr. Thomas K. Weber founded the Colon Cancer Challenge. This year, we continue Dr. Weber’s work to increase public awareness of colorectal cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, 51,020 people will die from colorectal cancer during 2019. The lifetime risk for colorectal cancer is nearly 1 in 22 for men and 1 in 24 for women. However, with early detection, the five-year survival rate is 90 percent. Chances are that you will know someone in your life who will be affected by this deadly disease. Join us on March 24 for the 2019 Colon Cancer Challenge to raise awareness about the second deadliest cancer.

 

Where Do the Funds Raised Go?

 

Every year, the Colon Cancer Foundation raises funds in order to raise awareness of colorectal cancer, the importance of early detection and the most effective screening methods available. As a 501(c)3 non-profit organization registered in New York State and listed by the Federal IRS as a public charity, we work hard to ensure that all funds align with our mission in the fight against colorectal cancer. The fundraising efforts at the 2019 Colon Cancer Challenge provide free educational materials and participation in outreach events, among other initiatives:

 

  • A national tour of our educational inflatable colon – the Rollin’ Colon.
  • Local, state, national and global programs that promote colorectal cancer prevention and early detection.
  • Awards to young colorectal cancer investigators presenting at the world’s premier societies and conferences.
  • Funding to support the nation’s only Summit focused on early age onset colorectal cancer.

 

How Can I Participate in the 2019 Colon Cancer Challenge?

 

There are numerous ways to show that you stand with colorectal cancer survivors and patients at the 2019 Colon Cancer Challenge. Our Two Mile Walk, 5K Run or Kids’ Fun Run offer a chance for the whole family to get involved. If you would like to volunteer, we have opportunities for all ages and groups. Please contact Marcline St. Germain, our volunteer coordinator, at 914.305.6674 or email at info@coloncancerchallenge.org. Additionally, you may download our Fundraising Toolkit to help raise money to support the Colon Cancer Foundation’s initiatives.

Congratulations to the members of Team Colon Cancer Challenge who conquered the TCS NYC Marathon this year! We are so grateful for the incredible spirit and fundraising efforts put forth by this team. Together, our team blazed past our fundraising goal to surpass $107,000! And every single member crossed the finish line on November 4.

On Marathon Eve, CCF hosted a team dinner at Covina. It was a wonderful evening of conversation and carbohydrates. Team members got the chance to meet each other and connect with CCF staff and our founder, Dr. Thomas Weber. Thank you to everyone who was able to attend!

Our international team came together from Hong Kong, Paris, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, and other corners of the country and the world – including, of course, NYC. This diverse group of runners comprised a colorectal cancer surgeon, children of survivors, and other relatives and caregivers of survivors and those who lost their fight. Hearing our runners’ stories (check them out on our Crowdrise site) reminds us all that we are a long way from the finish line in the battle against colorectal cancer. But we cannot let ourselves hit the wall at mile 20. We must keep going.

Events like the NYC Marathon are critical to achieving our annual fundraising goals so we are able to continue such important initiatives as our Annual Early-Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit. Through the Summit we are able to support and share the latest research into the causes and treatment of colorectal cancer. We WILL get to the bottom of this (so to speak) and we are proud to have such incredible athletes and advocates on our side.

Interested in joining Team Colon Cancer Challenge? Check out our events page for information about the 2019 NYC Half Marathon, as well as other upcoming events. Like to spin? Join us and our Young Leadership Board on December 2 for the Ride for Research at Swerve!

Many thanks again to our incredible 2018 TCS NYC Marathon team. We hope you enjoy a well-deserved Thanksgiving feast this year!

It was the drop heard ’round the colorectal cancer world.

On Wednesday the American Cancer Society released a study in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians recommending that colorectal cancer screenings should begin at age 45 – instead of age 50 – for those at average risk. The Colon Cancer Foundation has been in the trenches, championing research into the alarming rise of early-age onset colorectal cancer (EAO-CRC) for over a decade; so for us and so many other organizations and individuals in this fight, this is a watershed moment that is going to have a profound impact on the colorectal cancer landscape.

This is the first time that a prominent cancer organization has officially recognized that EAO-CRC is no fluke but a tragic and universal phenomenon that needs to be addressed immediately. 43% of EAO-CRC cases occur in those aged 45-49. If this new guideline becomes the norm, an estimated 22 million Americans can be screened, and thousands of lives will be saved.

As Dr. Thomas Weber, our founder and President, stated in an interview with The New York Times, “This is a very, very big deal. Solid epidemiological data from our national cancer registries documents a dramatic increase in the incidence of colon and especially rectal cancer among individuals under the age of 50, and the vast majority of those cases are in the 40- to 49-year-old age bracket.”

Dr. Thomas Weber addresses the crowd at the 4th Annual EAO-CRC Summit in NYC

The adoption of the revised ACS screening guideline will be a major step toward reversing the upward trend of EAO-CRC cases. In addition, physicians will soon have the added support of the Risk Assessment and Screening Toolkit – the brainchild of CCF and the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT). This toolkit was presented by Emily Edelman of the Jackson Laboratory at our 4th Annual EAO-CRC Summit held in April in NYC. It has been designed to give physicians much-needed resources and support to properly detect and treat colorectal cancer in those individuals with a family history of the disease; hereditary predispositions; as well as those under age 50.

We are hopeful that the powerful combination of the new ACS screening guidelines and the Risk Assessment and Screening Toolkit will help shift the tide of EAO-CRC. But there is still much work to be done. To learn more about the new ACS guidelines, click here. You can find more information about the 4th Annual EAO-CRC Summit here. To make a donation or get involved with CCF, please contact us!

The 15th Annual Colon Cancer Challenge rocked Randall’s Island on Sunday, March 25th. With twice as many participants as last year (and no snow!) we are excited to have cemented Randall’s Island and its iconic Icahn Stadium as the home of the Colon Cancer Challenge.

Our enthusiastic and dedicated participants raised over $57,000 to help us continue our mission of eradicating colorectal cancer through awareness, screening, prevention, and research.

Thank you to everyone who came out to join us!

Running Back To Support Foundation Efforts Through Survivor Visits, Fundraising and
Special In-Game Tribute

NEW YORK – New York Jets running back Bilal Powell and the Colon Cancer Foundation® announced today a new partnership aimed at defeating colon cancer and its devastating effects. Powell will help bring awareness to the disease, as well as generate funds in support of the Foundation’s prevention and translational research programs.

Bilal Powell New York Jet

Earlier this week, Powell visited Mt. Sinai Hospital of New York to spend time with cancer survivors and learn more about their respective experiences. During the visit, one patient – a lifelong fan of the team – provided creative input around the custom cleats Powell will wear as part of the league’s “My Cleats, My Cause” platform during Week 13. The design will pay tribute to those impacted by colorectal cancer, including Powell’s close friend who recently succumbed to the disease at the age of 36.

“This is an important issue that many people have little or no knowledge about until it’s too late,” Powell said. “The Colon Cancer Foundation is doing some excellent work in the fight against this ugly disease and I hope that together we can bring about awareness and make real change to help prevent future heartbreak and suffering.”

“We could not be more thrilled to have Bilal’s support,” said Cindy Borassi, Executive Director of the Colon Cancer Foundation. “Colon and rectal cancer can be stopped if people are aware, talk to their doctors and get screened. Fans across the nation can make a huge difference in saving lives and defeating colorectal cancer. We are so excited about this new partnership!”

This morning, Powell launched a Crowdrise campaign to directly benefit the Foundation’s commitment to spreading the word, finding a cure and providing optimal care for those most affected by the disease. Beginning today, supporters who donate $10 or more will also be entered into a raffle for the chance to win:
• Autographed memorabilia
• VIP game day experience and meet-and-greet with Powell (Sunday, Dec. 3)
• Pair of autographed, custom cleats worn by Powell during the Week 13 home game

For more information about the foundation or to donate to Powell’s campaign, visit www.crowdrise.com/bestseatsinthehouse

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About the Colon Cancer Foundation
The Colon Cancer Foundation (coloncancerchallenge.org) is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization registered in New York state and listed by the Federal IRS as a public charity dedicated to reducing colorectal cancer incidence and death. Its mission includes supporting research into the causes and cures for colorectal cancer, increasing public awareness, educating the public about the importance of early detection and forming strategic partnerships in the fight against colorectal cancer.

About the Mount Sinai Health System
The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services—from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care.

The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is in the “Honor Roll” of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 “Best Hospitals” issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation’s top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai’s Kravis Children’s Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in “Best Children’s Hospitals.”

For more information, visit www.mountsinai.org, or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

CONTACT:
Michael Chavez Booth
M&C Saatchi LA Sport & Entertainment
On behalf of Bilal Powell
mike.chavezbooth@mcsaatchi-la.com
619.757.6392

REGISTRATION IS OPEN FOR THE  COLON CANCER CHALLENGE 

OCTOBER 1, 2016, RANDALL’S ISLAND, NYC

We think the event is so worthwhile that we’ve compiled the top 8 reasons you should sign up for it right now:

8. You don’t even have to show up! You can register to run or walk the 5K, but you can also create your own Local Challenge – you can even SLEEP IN while raising money for a worthwhile cause. All you non-runners out there– you can now participate in a charity run that doesn’t involve running!

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Registration is now open for the Second Annual Early Age Onset of Colorectal Cancer Summit.

Join us on March 19th for a full day of cutting edge Community Building, Conversation, Medicine, Research and ACTION focused on addressing young adult colorectal cancer. Powered by our Survivor Community & their families the Summit this ground breaking program will, for a second year, provide both survivors and health care professional’s opportunities to leverage each other’s insights and provide an opportunity for all to hear leading clinicians and scientists on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, genomics and quality of life preserving treatment options for EAO-CRC.

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