In the cancer community usually, immune cells in a tumor can improve one’s chances of survival. However, a new study recently found that colorectal cancer patients with too many immune cells may be at risk for disease recurrence and increased risk of death.

New research from City of Hope, an independent research center, published a study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that offered insight that the standard view of immunology as a positive may adversely affect colorectal cancer patients. 71 patients with colorectal cancer at the City of Hope had immune cells and all of the patients relapsed – all even earlier than those who did not have the immune cells are still relapsed. The researchers hypothesized that the patients’ immune systems were on overdrive.

The study offered new insight into immunotherapy and Immunoscore, which is a recent benchmark that may predict the risk of colon cancer recurring in survivors. City of Hope has identified new recurrence insight based on their studies and hope to apply the same techniques to breast cancer patients and eventually melanoma and lung cancer.

Read more about the study and ask your physician about any questions you may have. 

 

Since the American Cancer Society reduced its screening guidelines for colorectal cancer, it’s no surprise that more young adults are affected by early age onset colon cancer. What is surprising, and just as alarming, is that more young adults are dying from colorectal cancer.

According to the American Cancer Society, the United States has seen a 51% increase in colorectal cancer in those under 50-years-old since 1994. The American Cancer Society reduced its screening guidelines for those at standard risk to 45-years-old because of the rise in early age onset colorectal cancer.

Despite the change in screening standards, mortality rates are increasing for those with early age onset colorectal cancer. According to Colorectal Cancer Alliance research, 67% of young early age onset colorectal cancer patients saw anywhere from two to four doctors before being diagnosed. This means that many patients were slow to recognize their symptoms, which can aid in early detection. 

Early symptoms may include: 

  • A change your bowel habits
  • Diarrhea and constipation
  • Frequent gas, bloating or cramps

 

Learn more about the common symptoms of colorectal cancer and educate your loved ones on how to get screened on our blog. If you have any questions, please reach out to us in the comments.

 

With the recent announcement of lowering the standard screening age to 45-years-old, it’s no surprise that colon cancer is on the rise among young adults in developed countries. Despite rates decreasing in older adults  due to increased screening, early-age onset colorectal cancer continues to affect Americans nationwide.

According to the study, colon cancer rates remained the same in 14 countries, fell in three countries and rose in 19 countries. Italy, Austria and Lithuania were the only countries to see a decrease in colon cancer rates among those under 50-years-old.

In America, and most of the other 19 countries were colon cancer rates increased, researchers indicated that the increase in diagnoses occurred in the mid 1990s. While there is no specific reason indicated in the study for the increase, many scientists agree that lifestyle choices often play a role in developing colon cancer. Increasing your exercise and reducing processed meat may decrease your chance of developing cancer.

However, the best thing that you can do is make sure that you get screened and encourage your loved ones too. If you are concerned about you or a loved one developing colon cancer, learn more about early-onset colon cancer. You should get screened at 45-years-old if you have an average risk and earlier if you have a family history of colorectal cancer.

For more information on early-age onset colorectal cancer, please reach out to us at info@coloncancerchallenge.org or (914) 305-6674.