During the holiday season, it can be difficult to stay healthy and keep your lifestyle and fitness goals. However, maintaining a healthy diet and staying active is a key component to helping fight early age onset colon cancer. Find a way to balance the holiday season with your loved ones and also keeping your health a priority with these simple tips.

 

Eat mindfully

While it can be easy to get carried away with holiday eating, make sure to balance your plate with whole foods, fruits and vegetables. A diet full of fresh fruits and vegetables are linked to decreasing your risk of early age onset colorectal cancer and shouldn’t full off of your plate during the holidays. There’s nothing wrong with treating yourself with a few sweets, but make sure to balance the rest of your meal.

 

Stay hydrated

The holiday season often brings copious amounts of alcohol. Try limiting yourself to only having a glass or two a night. Alcohol has links to colon and rectal cancer, so make sure to drink in moderation. Make sure to up your water content, too.

 

Stay connected through activities

Consider adding a new family tradition by incorporating activities that get you on your feet. After dinner, go for a walk around your neighborhood with your family or add a few exercises to your evenings while you watch TV together. Find small ways to get moving together while enjoying each other’s company.

 

While you’re focusing on your health this holiday season, also consider giving the gift of life by donating to the Colon Cancer Foundation. Donate today to support colon cancer patients, survivors and the research that helps us understand more about this deadly disease.

 

You may have heard that the American Cancer Society recently reduced its screening guidelines for colorectal cancer to 45-years-old. What does that mean and why were the screening guidelines reduced from 50-years-old? Learn more about what early age onset colorectal cancer is and what you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones.

 

Why were the colorectal screening guidelines reduced?

The American Cancer Society recently reduced the standard screening age for those at average risk of colorectal cancer for multiple reasons. The first, and possibly most important, is the increase of diagnoses at younger ages. Early age onset colorectal cancer occurs when people who are under 50-years-old develop colon cancer. While diagnoses over the age of 50-years-old and above are decreasing, those under 50-years-old are seeing higher rates of the disease. Reducing the screening age is one way to ensure that those diagnosed with early age onset colon cancer have a better chance of fighting the disease.

 

What can I do to prevent early age onset colorectal cancer?

Aside from regular screenings starting at 45-years-old, there are multiple ways that you can lower your risk for early age onset colorectal cancer. First, you can eat healthily and stay at a healthy weight. Avoid process meats and sugar, while adding in more fruits and vegetables into your diet. Maintaining a healthy diet is one of the first steps to making sure you stay healthy as you age. Second, learn about your family history. If anyone has had colorectal cancer in your family, you may be more prone to developing the disease. Additionally, ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease may increase your risk of colorectal cancer. Finally, pay attention to early symptoms.[1] If you notice changes in your bowel movements or increase in fatigue, talk to your physician about the symptoms.

 

If you think you may be at risk for early age onset colorectal cancer, reach out to your family physician. Early detection is key in survival rates for colorectal cancer, so make sure to take your symptoms seriously and stay on top of your health.

Learn more about colorectal cancer and stay up-to-date by reading our blog.

Colorectal cancer, commonly known as colon cancer, is one of the world’s deadliest cancers. However, there is a lot of confusion about the disease. Know the facts about colorectal cancer and what puts you at risk.

 

What is colorectal cancer?

Colorectal cancer occurs where there are abnormal cells that divide and survive within your color or the rectum. According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer often starts as a noncancerous growth, called a polyp. The most common type is an adenomatous polyp, also known as an adenoma. While one-third of people can expect to develop at least one adenoma, only 10 percent are estimated to turn into cancer. The chance that the adenoma becomes cancerous increases as it gets bigger.

 

How likely am I to get colorectal cancer?

In 2019, there will be around 101,420 new cases of colon cancer and 44,180 new cases of rectal cancer. Right now, your lifetime odds of developing colorectal cancer is 1 in 22 for men and 1 in 24 for women. However, there are various other factors that will affect your likeliness to develop the disease. The American Cancer Society predicts that there are over one million colorectal cancer survivors today.

 

Why are men more likely to get colorectal cancer than women?

Colorectal cancer is 30 percent more likely to occur in men than women. Risk factors, such as likeliness to smoke cigarettes and hormones, play a large role in making cancer more prominent in men. According to studies from the American Cancer Society, the median age for colon cancer diagnoses in men is 68-years-old and for women is 72-years-old. The median age for colon cancer diagnoses for both men and women is 63-years-old.

 

What is the survival rate for colorectal cancer?

Luckily, deaths related to colorectal cancer are decreasing due to earlier screening and advanced technology. According to the American Cancer Society, the relative survival rate for colorectal cancer is at 65 percent at five years after diagnoses and 58 percent at 10 years after diagnoses. One way to increase your chance of fighting this deadly disease is to follow the screening guidelines and pay attention to early warning signs of colorectal cancer.[1]

Learn more about colorectal cancer through our other blogs and get involved with the Colon Cancer Foundation to help us support colorectal cancer survivors and their families.

 

When it comes to protecting yourself against the second deadliest cancer, consider looking at your diet as a starting point. Colorectal cancer, which is the cancer of the large intestine, is expected to cause over 51,000 deaths during 2019. While early detection is a key component, consider talking to your doctor about these top colon cancer-fighting foods as well.

Top Colon Cancer Fighting Foods #1: Lean Meats
While heavily processed meats are not ideal for a colon cancer-fighting diet, lean meats–packed with protein–will help you stay healthy. Protein helps your cells repair themselves and also keep you full. Good sources of lean protein include salmon, turkey and pork chops. Make sure to trim the fats off of your meat, though.

Top Colon Cancer Fighting Foods #2: Dark Leafy Greens
Dark, leafy greens are a great source of fiber, which can help you fight most cancer. Spinach may also help keep your colon polyp-free due to its high amount of magnesium. Not a fan like Popeye the Sailor? You can also get magnesium from almonds, cashews or potatoes.

Top Colon Cancer Fighting Foods #3: Low-Sugar Fruit
Sugar often leads to inflammation, which may increase your odds of developing colorectal cancer. If you have a sweet tooth, switch out some of your high-sugar snacks for fruit instead. Low-sugar fruits include peaches, melons, strawberries, oranges and grapefruit. Pack some fruit in your bag to keep you snacking on colon-friendly foods all day.

Top Colon Cancer Fighting Foods #4: Greek Yogurt
Minimally processed dairy, such as Greek yogurt, contain great sources of calcium and protein. The probiotics in Greek yogurt also pack a great punch for keeping your digestive system healthy. Probiotics help you balance the “good” and “bad” bacteria in your gut. Mix your yogurt together with low-sugar fruit in the morning to keep your colon cancer-fighting diet on track.

Top Colon Cancer Fighting Foods #6: Water
Last, but not least: water. Make sure to stay hydrated when you consume the top colon cancer-fighting foods. Water helps aid digestion and can minimize common colorectal cancer side effects, such as constipation.

While the death rate of colorectal cancer is steadily decreasing due to public awareness, we still have a long way to go regarding the fight to eradicate the disease. Join the Colon Cancer Foundation at our 2019 Colon Cancer Challenge to get involved and show your support for the colorectal cancer community, including the one million survivors of colorectal cancer.