Did you catch our recap on the Fifth Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit? We are excited to share video footage from our groundbreaking conference on preventing colorectal cancer. If you were unable to attend, please watch these short recaps on various sessions throughout the summit.

 

Palliative Care

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pURzAM80gMo

In session six, Sarah DeBord, a patient, discusses building her own cancer support system and her familiarity with palliative care, including lobbying for more support. She uses a specific analogy of an onion to describe the layers of care that a patient requires.

 

Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations in Individuals 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyO1_lMk2K4

Dr. Matthew B. Yurgelun shared the shift in mentality in how physicians look at hereditary colorectal cancer. Dr. Yurgelun shares how next-generation sequencing technologies allow for rapid assessment of genes in a way that is deeper than researchers could understand in the past. 

 

Framing the Conversation

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsHZP8_bMCE

One of our favorite, but most heartbreaking, moments of the conference included various attendees sharing their personal stories with colorectal cancer. These stories show the importance of getting tested and staying educated on the dangers of colon cancer.

 

Discover the rest of our videos from the summit on our YouTube page and learn more about the summit on our website.

 

Palliative Care is a trending topic in many cancer circles right now and is making headway as general medical care for those with colorectal or colon cancer. Palliative care is a specific treatment for those suffering from severe illness with the hopes of providing relief from symptoms. While palliative care is still becoming mainstream for those who are suffering from colorectal cancer, many patients who are struggling with the disease are finding relief that is aiding their fight against cancer.

 

How was Palliative Care Created?

According to the Center for Palliative Care at the Harvard Medical School, palliative care started in the United Kingdom in the 1960s. Medical professionals aimed to ease the pain and suffering of terminal cancer patients who had run out of options. The field developed, however, to treat those with non-terminal illnesses to relieve the suffering of any patient, regardless of disease.

 

How Does Palliative Care Help Colorectal Cancer Patients?

Many colorectal cancer patients face day-to-day issues that stem from not only their cancer but necessary treatment to eradicate the disease as well. Palliative care can treat symptoms from colorectal cancer, such as discomfort in bowel impactions or issues in the large intestine. Blockages can irritate the body and require surgery, but palliative care can change a patient’s quality of life to prevent discomfort.

 

Where Can I Get More Information About Palliative Care?

If you want to learn more about palliative care, contact your family physician doctor to discuss treatment options. Improving the quality of life for colorectal cancer patients is essential to aide their fight against the deadly disease. Our Fifth Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit discussed the latest trends and innovations regarding palliative care last May. The Colon Cancer Foundation is proud to support physicians and researchers who are actively tackling palliative care and other vital topics that affect those with colorectal cancer.

For more information on palliative care, please reach out to us at info@coloncancerchallenge.org or (914) 305-6674.

 

We are proud to announce our Fifth Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit was a success in bringing together the nation’s experts on early age onset colorectal cancer last month. The event, held at The Times Center in New York City, focused on performing a knowledge GAP analysis and building a strategic “action plan” to reduce early age onset colorectal cancer incidence & mortality.

 

At the summit, leading clinicians, scientists and early age onset colorectal cancer survivors shared their experience with colorectal cancer treatment. Lectures, workshops and panel discussions provided innovative approaches to palliative care and featured world-renowned speakers from leading academic medical centers. Popular sessions ranged from “Identifying the Key Elements of a Center for Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer – Panel Discussion” to “Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations in Individuals with Colorectal Cancer.”

 

One of this year’s highlights included a “Research in Progress” segment, where participants learned about NCI funded and planned early age onset colorectal research projects from across the world. Participants learned more about recent research and evidence-based framework for reducing risk in those susceptible to early age onset colorectal cancer.

Our poster presentation at the fifth annual summit showcased research or programs that have the potential to impact how we treat early age onset colorectal cancer. “Does the Impact of Tumor Sideedness Differ for Young-Onset Vs. Later-Onset Colorectal Cancer” by Lucas D. Lee, MD, at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas received first place for the abstract awards. For a complete list of abstracts, please read more in the Fifth Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit agenda.

ABSTRACT AWARDS

FIRST PLACE

DOES THE IMPACT OF TUMOR SIDEDNESS DIFFER FOR YOUNG-ONSET VS. LATER-ONSET COLORECTAL CANCER?

Lucas D. Lee, MD

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

SECOND PLACE

THE PSYCHOSOCIAL AND FINANCIAL BURDEN ON CAREGIVERS OF YOUNG-ONSET COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

Kimberley Newcomer, BS, CPPN Colorectal Cancer Alliance, Washington, DC

THIRD PLACE

CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL, FAMILIAL, AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF RECTAL CANCER WITHIN EARLY- ONSET COLORECTAL CANCER

José Perea, MD, PhD
Fundación Jiménez Díaz University Hospital and Health Research Institute, Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer-UAM Observatory, Madrid, Spain

Thank you to all of our sponsors who made the event possible. If you are interested in sponsoring any Colorectal Cancer Foundation events in the future, please contact us at 914.305.6675 to learn more.

 

What are you getting your dad this year for Father’s Day? One way to show him you care is by bringing up the statistics about colorectal cancer and making sure he knows about regular screenings. While a discussion about colorectal cancer may not be at the top of his list, show dad you love and care about him this Father’s Day by reminding him about getting screened.

 

The lifetime risk for colorectal cancer in men is 1 in 22, according to the American Cancer Society. Why are men more likely to get colorectal cancer than women? One theory, according to the American Cancer Society, is that men are more likely to develop colorectal cancer than women mostly due to lifestyle choices, such as cigarette smoking.

 

While men can’t change that they are more likely to develop colorectal cancer, there are numerous lifestyle choices they can make to decrease their risk of developing the deadly disease. Your dad can work to control his weight, physical activity and diet to decrease his odds of getting colorectal cancer.

 

The best thing, however, is to abide by the American Cancer Society’s recommended screening guidelines. If your dad has an average risk of developing colorectal cancer, he should get screened starting at 45-years-old. If your family has a family history of colon cancer or higher risk, the screening guidelines will vary. Talk to your primary care physician for more information.

 

While colon cancer can be a scary topic to talk about, it’s important to have conversations with your family about the disease. Make sure to have a discussion with dad this Father’s Day about what everyone can do to protect your butt against colorectal cancer. Encourage him to talk to his family care physician about colorectal cancer and the steps he can take to decrease his risk.

 

Thinking that you might have colorectal cancer is a terrifying thought. What if we told you that the death rate has dropped for several decades in both men in women? Due to updated screening methods, earlier detection, and improved treatment, there are more than one million colorectal cancer survivors in the United States. Learn more about how to screen for colorectal cancer and what the process means for you and your family.

 

What do I need to know about how to screen for colorectal cancer?

Finding colorectal cancer when it is small – and hasn’t spread – is often key to higher success in defeating the third deadliest cancer. TheAmerican Cancer Society currently recommends that people at average risk start regular screenings at 45-years-old. This number recently decreased due to the increased rate of younger adults developing colorectal cancer. If you are in good health, you should continue the regular screenings until you are 75-years-old. From 76-years-old to 85-years-old, the decision to screen for colorectal cancer depends on your overall health and preference. For those above the age of 85-years-old, there are no current recommendations for colorectal screening.

 

What happens during a colorectal cancer screening?

There are two categories of colorectal cancer screenings, according to the American Cancer Society. Stool-based tests allow an opportunity for the discovery of polyps. Many stool-based tests for hidden blood in stool samples. There are no precautions that need to be made before the test, such as dietary restrictions. The other test, a colonoscopy, is often needed to further diagnose after the stool-based tests.

What happens if I get an abnormal screening for colorectal cancer?

If your results from the stool-based test come back abnormal, you will need a colonoscopy to diagnose whether you have colorectal cancer. During a colonoscopy, the physician will look at the length of your colon and may biopsy and/or remove any polyps. Colonoscopies need to be performed less, but they take more preparation than stool-based tests.

Learn more about what you can do to protect your butt against colorectal cancer. If you have any questions or concerns about colorectal cancer screenings, reach out to your primary doctor.

 

You may have heard that the American Cancer Society recently reduced its screening guidelines for colorectal cancer to 45-years-old. What does that mean and why were the screening guidelines reduced from 50-years-old? Learn more about what early age onset colorectal cancer is and what you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones.

 

Why were the colorectal screening guidelines reduced?

The American Cancer Society recently reduced the standard screening age for those at average risk of colorectal cancer for multiple reasons. The first, and possibly most important, is the increase of diagnoses at younger ages. Early age onset colorectal cancer occurs when people who are under 50-years-old develop colon cancer. While diagnoses over the age of 50-years-old and above are decreasing, those under 50-years-old are seeing higher rates of the disease. Reducing the screening age is one way to ensure that those diagnosed with early age onset colon cancer have a better chance of fighting the disease.

 

What can I do to prevent early age onset colorectal cancer?

Aside from regular screenings starting at 45-years-old, there are multiple ways that you can lower your risk for early age onset colorectal cancer. First, you can eat healthily and stay at a healthy weight. Avoid process meats and sugar, while adding in more fruits and vegetables into your diet. Maintaining a healthy diet is one of the first steps to making sure you stay healthy as you age. Second, learn about your family history. If anyone has had colorectal cancer in your family, you may be more prone to developing the disease. Additionally, ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease may increase your risk of colorectal cancer. Finally, pay attention to early symptoms.[1] If you notice changes in your bowel movements or increase in fatigue, talk to your physician about the symptoms.

 

If you think you may be at risk for early age onset colorectal cancer, reach out to your family physician. Early detection is key in survival rates for colorectal cancer, so make sure to take your symptoms seriously and stay on top of your health.

Learn more about colorectal cancer and stay up-to-date by reading our blog.

Colorectal cancer, commonly known as colon cancer, is one of the world’s deadliest cancers. However, there is a lot of confusion about the disease. Know the facts about colorectal cancer and what puts you at risk.

 

What is colorectal cancer?

Colorectal cancer occurs where there are abnormal cells that divide and survive within your color or the rectum. According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer often starts as a noncancerous growth, called a polyp. The most common type is an adenomatous polyp, also known as an adenoma. While one-third of people can expect to develop at least one adenoma, only 10 percent are estimated to turn into cancer. The chance that the adenoma becomes cancerous increases as it gets bigger.

 

How likely am I to get colorectal cancer?

In 2019, there will be around 101,420 new cases of colon cancer and 44,180 new cases of rectal cancer. Right now, your lifetime odds of developing colorectal cancer is 1 in 22 for men and 1 in 24 for women. However, there are various other factors that will affect your likeliness to develop the disease. The American Cancer Society predicts that there are over one million colorectal cancer survivors today.

 

Why are men more likely to get colorectal cancer than women?

Colorectal cancer is 30 percent more likely to occur in men than women. Risk factors, such as likeliness to smoke cigarettes and hormones, play a large role in making cancer more prominent in men. According to studies from the American Cancer Society, the median age for colon cancer diagnoses in men is 68-years-old and for women is 72-years-old. The median age for colon cancer diagnoses for both men and women is 63-years-old.

 

What is the survival rate for colorectal cancer?

Luckily, deaths related to colorectal cancer are decreasing due to earlier screening and advanced technology. According to the American Cancer Society, the relative survival rate for colorectal cancer is at 65 percent at five years after diagnoses and 58 percent at 10 years after diagnoses. One way to increase your chance of fighting this deadly disease is to follow the screening guidelines and pay attention to early warning signs of colorectal cancer.[1]

Learn more about colorectal cancer through our other blogs and get involved with the Colon Cancer Foundation to help us support colorectal cancer survivors and their families.