A study conducted by researchers in Japan found that cigarette smoking may increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence in a Japanese population While smoking has been associated with an increased risk of CRC among Western populations, it has not been investigated as a risk factor in Asian populations prior to this study, according to the authors.

 

Statistics show that 60% of CRC cases occur in developed countries and CRC incidence continues to increase rapidly in Asia. Specifically, Japan experienced an increase in cases from 1978 to 1993 and has remained stable since then but is still among the top 10 countries with the highest incidence of CRC. A separate Japanese study found a gender-based difference in CRC incidence, with men being more susceptible to rectal cancer and women being more susceptible to colon cancer:

 

Colon cancer:

  • Men: 65.7%
  • Women: 75.4%

Rectal cancer:

  • Men: 34.3%
  • Women: 27.0%

 

It is hypothesized that environmental and lifestyle factors, such as smoking, can increase the risk of CRC. In Japan, for instance, 80% of men and 20% of women were smokers in the 1950s. However, a significant reduction was observed in smoking rates by 2017: only 32% of men and 9% of women were smokers. The age-standardized CRC incidence rate was 22.2 in 1978 and 38.9 in 2018.

 

Tobacco use can cause many different cancers, including mouth, larynx, lung, kidney, liver, and many more . In 2014, the U.S. Surgeon General’s report added CRC to the list of tobacco-related cancers. However, there are some issues with this:

  • Evidence supporting the claim that the use of tobacco is associated with the development of colon cancer has been derived mainly from Western populations while data from Asian populations are conflicting. More research is needed on this association in Asian populations.
  • Meta-analysis by geographic region did not find a significant association between smoking and CRC in Asian studies

The Japanese study aimed to investigate the correlation of smoking and CRC incidence in Asian populations.

 

Researchers used original data from major cohort studies performed by the Research Group for the Development and Evaluation of Cancer Prevention Strategies in Japan. The following criteria  were used when examining these studies for this analysis:

 

  • Population-based cohort studies conducted in Japan
  • Studies initiated between the mid-1980s and mid-1990s
  • Studies with more than 30,000 participants
  • Studies that acquired information on health-related lifestyles
  • Studies that followed the incidence of CRC

 

A self-administered questionnaire at the baseline survey determined if each participant was a smoker and classified them into one of three groups: never smoker, former smoker, or current smoker. Participants were followed-up for CRC incidence from the baseline study until the date of CRC diagnosis, migration out of the study area, death or the end of follow-up, whichever was first. The end of the follow-up period was between December 31, 1992 and December 31, 2014.

 

The study found that men who were ever, current or former smokers had a statistically significant higher risk of CRC than never smokers. Ever and current smoking increased the risk of both colon and rectal cancer, while former smokers had an increased risk of colon cancer.

Women who were ever, current or former smokers did not have an increased risk of CRC, but a significantly greater risk of distal colon cancer. Women who were heavily exposed to smoking had an increased risk of CRC.

 

Colon cancer is one of the most preventable diseases through screening methods and avoiding risk factors such as smoking , obesity, and poor diet. The American Cancer Society recommends getting screened at age 45 or younger if you have a family history of CRC.

Last updated March 16, 2020

Dear Friends,

As we continue to monitor developments regarding COVID-19, we hope that you and your loved ones are healthy and safe.

This situation is evolving daily and will continue to impact our communities in evolving ways. Yet, we take comfort in knowing that we have incredible people like you who are compassionate, resilient, and who consistently give back and pay it forward.

Due to this morning’s announcements by the Governors of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut prohibiting gatherings of more than 50 people we have no choice but to cancel the Colon Cancer Challenge at Randall’s Island scheduled for March 29th, 2020.

We can’t thank you enough for your hard work on our behalf and the contributions you have already made. As you know Colorectal Cancer doesn’t stop for anyone – not even COVID-19and your support will enable us to continue to fight the nation’s second leading form of cancer as we weather this storm.

For those of you who are interested in maintaining the fitness level required for a 2M walk or a 5K we recommend you turn this into an opportunity to join us for a “virtual” walk/run/bike ride” in your neighborhood or community park. (Observing social distancing recommendations of course). More details to follow!

We are also looking into the possibility of rescheduling the Colon Cancer Challenge for the fall. We will keep you posted as opportunities arise to be involved in In-person, live events to support our mission – A World Without Colorectal Cancer™.

In the meantime, we encourage you to visit these websites for the most current information and guidance, the New York City Department of Health (NYCDOH), the New York State Department of Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

We also strongly encourage those in our community who are at a higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19 to take actions to reduce their risk of getting sick with the disease. For more information please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/high-risk-complications.html

If you have any questions you can contact the Colon Cancer Foundation by email at info@coloncancerfoundation.org or by phone at 914-305-6674.

Our sincerest wishes for a safe and healthy spring,

Cindy R. Borassi

Interim President

Colon Cancer Foundation

If you have someone in your life that you would like to honor while supporting the mission of the Colon Cancer Foundation, consider creating a tribute page. A tribute page either celebrates the life of a colorectal cancer survivor or honors their memory. Tribute pages offer an opportunity to help others fight one of the United States’ deadliest cancers.

You can create a Tribute Page by visiting our Donate and Support section on our website. A Tribute Page is a perfect opportunity to share your loved one’s story and encourage others to get involved in the fight against colorectal cancer. Visitors to the page can pledge support to the Colon Cancer Foundation, which will support colorectal cancer patients and survivors across the nation — unlike flowers of gifts! Our CCF Donation Center will then help you tackle donations by sending you a convenient notification every time someone takes an action on your Tribute Page.

There are various ways that you can create a Tribute Page. First, you can make a Lasting Tribute Page to honor a loved one that was successful in fighting colorectal cancer. You may also create an In Memory or In Honor Tribute Page if your loved one’s life was taken too shortly by colon cancer. For either version, please contact us at info@coloncancerchallenge.org or call at 914.305.6674 for more information on how to get started.

Finally, you may also choose to make your donation through the mail. If you send a donation in the mail, make sure to include a note with the name of the person you are honoring and an address where you would like the acknowledgment of donation to go. Please address your contribution as:

 

ATTN: Honor/Memorial Gifts

Colon Cancer Foundation

10 Midland Ave, Suite M-06

Port Chester, NY 10573

 

For more information, please contact us at info@coloncancerchallenge.org or call us at 914.305.6674.

 

Did you catch our recap on the Fifth Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit? We are excited to share video footage from our groundbreaking conference on preventing colorectal cancer. If you were unable to attend, please watch these short recaps on various sessions throughout the summit.

 

Palliative Care

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pURzAM80gMo

In session six, Sarah DeBord, a patient, discusses building her own cancer support system and her familiarity with palliative care, including lobbying for more support. She uses a specific analogy of an onion to describe the layers of care that a patient requires.

 

Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations in Individuals 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyO1_lMk2K4

Dr. Matthew B. Yurgelun shared the shift in mentality in how physicians look at hereditary colorectal cancer. Dr. Yurgelun shares how next-generation sequencing technologies allow for rapid assessment of genes in a way that is deeper than researchers could understand in the past. 

 

Framing the Conversation

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsHZP8_bMCE

One of our favorite, but most heartbreaking, moments of the conference included various attendees sharing their personal stories with colorectal cancer. These stories show the importance of getting tested and staying educated on the dangers of colon cancer.

 

Discover the rest of our videos from the summit on our YouTube page and learn more about the summit on our website.

 

Palliative Care is a trending topic in many cancer circles right now and is making headway as general medical care for those with colorectal or colon cancer. Palliative care is a specific treatment for those suffering from severe illness with the hopes of providing relief from symptoms. While palliative care is still becoming mainstream for those who are suffering from colorectal cancer, many patients who are struggling with the disease are finding relief that is aiding their fight against cancer.

 

How was Palliative Care Created?

According to the Center for Palliative Care at the Harvard Medical School, palliative care started in the United Kingdom in the 1960s. Medical professionals aimed to ease the pain and suffering of terminal cancer patients who had run out of options. The field developed, however, to treat those with non-terminal illnesses to relieve the suffering of any patient, regardless of disease.

 

How Does Palliative Care Help Colorectal Cancer Patients?

Many colorectal cancer patients face day-to-day issues that stem from not only their cancer but necessary treatment to eradicate the disease as well. Palliative care can treat symptoms from colorectal cancer, such as discomfort in bowel impactions or issues in the large intestine. Blockages can irritate the body and require surgery, but palliative care can change a patient’s quality of life to prevent discomfort.

 

Where Can I Get More Information About Palliative Care?

If you want to learn more about palliative care, contact your family physician doctor to discuss treatment options. Improving the quality of life for colorectal cancer patients is essential to aide their fight against the deadly disease. Our Fifth Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit discussed the latest trends and innovations regarding palliative care last May. The Colon Cancer Foundation is proud to support physicians and researchers who are actively tackling palliative care and other vital topics that affect those with colorectal cancer.

For more information on palliative care, please reach out to us at info@coloncancerchallenge.org or (914) 305-6674.

 

We are proud to announce our Fifth Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit was a success in bringing together the nation’s experts on early age onset colorectal cancer last month. The event, held at The Times Center in New York City, focused on performing a knowledge GAP analysis and building a strategic “action plan” to reduce early age onset colorectal cancer incidence & mortality.

 

At the summit, leading clinicians, scientists and early age onset colorectal cancer survivors shared their experience with colorectal cancer treatment. Lectures, workshops and panel discussions provided innovative approaches to palliative care and featured world-renowned speakers from leading academic medical centers. Popular sessions ranged from “Identifying the Key Elements of a Center for Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer – Panel Discussion” to “Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations in Individuals with Colorectal Cancer.”

 

One of this year’s highlights included a “Research in Progress” segment, where participants learned about NCI funded and planned early age onset colorectal research projects from across the world. Participants learned more about recent research and evidence-based framework for reducing risk in those susceptible to early age onset colorectal cancer.

Our poster presentation at the fifth annual summit showcased research or programs that have the potential to impact how we treat early age onset colorectal cancer. “Does the Impact of Tumor Sideedness Differ for Young-Onset Vs. Later-Onset Colorectal Cancer” by Lucas D. Lee, MD, at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas received first place for the abstract awards. For a complete list of abstracts, please read more in the Fifth Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit agenda.

ABSTRACT AWARDS

FIRST PLACE

DOES THE IMPACT OF TUMOR SIDEDNESS DIFFER FOR YOUNG-ONSET VS. LATER-ONSET COLORECTAL CANCER?

Lucas D. Lee, MD

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

SECOND PLACE

THE PSYCHOSOCIAL AND FINANCIAL BURDEN ON CAREGIVERS OF YOUNG-ONSET COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

Kimberley Newcomer, BS, CPPN Colorectal Cancer Alliance, Washington, DC

THIRD PLACE

CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL, FAMILIAL, AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF RECTAL CANCER WITHIN EARLY- ONSET COLORECTAL CANCER

José Perea, MD, PhD
Fundación Jiménez Díaz University Hospital and Health Research Institute, Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer-UAM Observatory, Madrid, Spain

Thank you to all of our sponsors who made the event possible. If you are interested in sponsoring any Colorectal Cancer Foundation events in the future, please contact us at 914.305.6675 to learn more.

 

What are you getting your dad this year for Father’s Day? One way to show him you care is by bringing up the statistics about colorectal cancer and making sure he knows about regular screenings. While a discussion about colorectal cancer may not be at the top of his list, show dad you love and care about him this Father’s Day by reminding him about getting screened.

 

The lifetime risk for colorectal cancer in men is 1 in 22, according to the American Cancer Society. Why are men more likely to get colorectal cancer than women? One theory, according to the American Cancer Society, is that men are more likely to develop colorectal cancer than women mostly due to lifestyle choices, such as cigarette smoking.

 

While men can’t change that they are more likely to develop colorectal cancer, there are numerous lifestyle choices they can make to decrease their risk of developing the deadly disease. Your dad can work to control his weight, physical activity and diet to decrease his odds of getting colorectal cancer.

 

The best thing, however, is to abide by the American Cancer Society’s recommended screening guidelines. If your dad has an average risk of developing colorectal cancer, he should get screened starting at 45-years-old. If your family has a family history of colon cancer or higher risk, the screening guidelines will vary. Talk to your primary care physician for more information.

 

While colon cancer can be a scary topic to talk about, it’s important to have conversations with your family about the disease. Make sure to have a discussion with dad this Father’s Day about what everyone can do to protect your butt against colorectal cancer. Encourage him to talk to his family care physician about colorectal cancer and the steps he can take to decrease his risk.

 

Thinking that you might have colorectal cancer is a terrifying thought. What if we told you that the death rate has dropped for several decades in both men in women? Due to updated screening methods, earlier detection, and improved treatment, there are more than one million colorectal cancer survivors in the United States. Learn more about how to screen for colorectal cancer and what the process means for you and your family.

 

What do I need to know about how to screen for colorectal cancer?

Finding colorectal cancer when it is small – and hasn’t spread – is often key to higher success in defeating the third deadliest cancer. TheAmerican Cancer Society currently recommends that people at average risk start regular screenings at 45-years-old. This number recently decreased due to the increased rate of younger adults developing colorectal cancer. If you are in good health, you should continue the regular screenings until you are 75-years-old. From 76-years-old to 85-years-old, the decision to screen for colorectal cancer depends on your overall health and preference. For those above the age of 85-years-old, there are no current recommendations for colorectal screening.

 

What happens during a colorectal cancer screening?

There are two categories of colorectal cancer screenings, according to the American Cancer Society. Stool-based tests allow an opportunity for the discovery of polyps. Many stool-based tests for hidden blood in stool samples. There are no precautions that need to be made before the test, such as dietary restrictions. The other test, a colonoscopy, is often needed to further diagnose after the stool-based tests.

What happens if I get an abnormal screening for colorectal cancer?

If your results from the stool-based test come back abnormal, you will need a colonoscopy to diagnose whether you have colorectal cancer. During a colonoscopy, the physician will look at the length of your colon and may biopsy and/or remove any polyps. Colonoscopies need to be performed less, but they take more preparation than stool-based tests.

Learn more about what you can do to protect your butt against colorectal cancer. If you have any questions or concerns about colorectal cancer screenings, reach out to your primary doctor.

 

You may have heard that the American Cancer Society recently reduced its screening guidelines for colorectal cancer to 45-years-old. What does that mean and why were the screening guidelines reduced from 50-years-old? Learn more about what early age onset colorectal cancer is and what you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones.

 

Why were the colorectal screening guidelines reduced?

The American Cancer Society recently reduced the standard screening age for those at average risk of colorectal cancer for multiple reasons. The first, and possibly most important, is the increase of diagnoses at younger ages. Early age onset colorectal cancer occurs when people who are under 50-years-old develop colon cancer. While diagnoses over the age of 50-years-old and above are decreasing, those under 50-years-old are seeing higher rates of the disease. Reducing the screening age is one way to ensure that those diagnosed with early age onset colon cancer have a better chance of fighting the disease.

 

What can I do to prevent early age onset colorectal cancer?

Aside from regular screenings starting at 45-years-old, there are multiple ways that you can lower your risk for early age onset colorectal cancer. First, you can eat healthily and stay at a healthy weight. Avoid process meats and sugar, while adding in more fruits and vegetables into your diet. Maintaining a healthy diet is one of the first steps to making sure you stay healthy as you age. Second, learn about your family history. If anyone has had colorectal cancer in your family, you may be more prone to developing the disease. Additionally, ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease may increase your risk of colorectal cancer. Finally, pay attention to early symptoms.[1] If you notice changes in your bowel movements or increase in fatigue, talk to your physician about the symptoms.

 

If you think you may be at risk for early age onset colorectal cancer, reach out to your family physician. Early detection is key in survival rates for colorectal cancer, so make sure to take your symptoms seriously and stay on top of your health.

Learn more about colorectal cancer and stay up-to-date by reading our blog.

Colorectal cancer, commonly known as colon cancer, is one of the world’s deadliest cancers. However, there is a lot of confusion about the disease. Know the facts about colorectal cancer and what puts you at risk.

 

What is colorectal cancer?

Colorectal cancer occurs where there are abnormal cells that divide and survive within your color or the rectum. According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer often starts as a noncancerous growth, called a polyp. The most common type is an adenomatous polyp, also known as an adenoma. While one-third of people can expect to develop at least one adenoma, only 10 percent are estimated to turn into cancer. The chance that the adenoma becomes cancerous increases as it gets bigger.

 

How likely am I to get colorectal cancer?

In 2019, there will be around 101,420 new cases of colon cancer and 44,180 new cases of rectal cancer. Right now, your lifetime odds of developing colorectal cancer is 1 in 22 for men and 1 in 24 for women. However, there are various other factors that will affect your likeliness to develop the disease. The American Cancer Society predicts that there are over one million colorectal cancer survivors today.

 

Why are men more likely to get colorectal cancer than women?

Colorectal cancer is 30 percent more likely to occur in men than women. Risk factors, such as likeliness to smoke cigarettes and hormones, play a large role in making cancer more prominent in men. According to studies from the American Cancer Society, the median age for colon cancer diagnoses in men is 68-years-old and for women is 72-years-old. The median age for colon cancer diagnoses for both men and women is 63-years-old.

 

What is the survival rate for colorectal cancer?

Luckily, deaths related to colorectal cancer are decreasing due to earlier screening and advanced technology. According to the American Cancer Society, the relative survival rate for colorectal cancer is at 65 percent at five years after diagnoses and 58 percent at 10 years after diagnoses. One way to increase your chance of fighting this deadly disease is to follow the screening guidelines and pay attention to early warning signs of colorectal cancer.[1]

Learn more about colorectal cancer through our other blogs and get involved with the Colon Cancer Foundation to help us support colorectal cancer survivors and their families.