Colorectal cancer, which is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, will affect around 1 in 22 men and 1 in 24 women in our lifetime. While there are numerous links between hereditary and lifestyle risks of developing colon cancer, there are still unknown risks with the disease. Recently, researchers in France discovered a new link between onset colorectal cancer.

 

Hôpitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor’s Dr. Iradj Sobhani and the University Paris-Est Créteil conducted research in a mice model that shows the correlation between onset colorectal cancer and the dysbiosis, a sensitive gut microbiota.

 

The study was conducted based on previous research that showed a link between gut microbes and onset colon cancer. The study covered 136 mice, which had stool samples from nine people with sporadic colon cancer or nine people without colon cancer.

 

The mice that had samples from those with sporadic colon cancer had traces of dysbiosis and precancerous lesions. The results of the research prompted the group to develop a non-invasive blood test to screen for dysbiosis.

 

The researchers were able to link their blood test in preliminary studies, but will run larger trials to ensure it can be implemented on a larger scale. The non-invasive blood test is a promising step forward in helping to diagnose those that will develop colon cancer without a predisposed risk factor.

 

Stay up-to-date on other colorectal cancer news and research with the Colon Cancer Foundation blog.

 

Will Smith, best known for his role in the Fresh Prince of Bel Air and numerous blockbuster movies, made headline news for his role in raising awareness of colon cancer. 

 

African-Americans have the highest death rate and shortest survival of most cancers in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society. Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in African-Americans and the most common ethnic group to develop colorectal cancer. Incident rates are 19% higher for African-American women and 24% higher for African-American men compared to Caucasians.

 

Because of these daunting statistics, Smith used his platform to raise awareness to his social media followers. Smith vlogged his visit to the doctor where he received a colonoscopy. During the procedure, a precancerous polyp was found and removed. Smith and his doctor discussed the ramifications of colon cancer and what would have happened if he had not received a colonoscopy. 

 

Watch Smith’s experience in this short video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWwKQjUyoUc.

 

We applaud Smith for using his platform to discuss the risks of colon cancer and to raise awareness of this deadly disease. Share this article with a loved one and make sure your family members are getting tested at their recommended age.

 

During the holiday season, it can be difficult to stay healthy and keep your lifestyle and fitness goals. However, maintaining a healthy diet and staying active is a key component to helping fight early age onset colon cancer. Find a way to balance the holiday season with your loved ones and also keeping your health a priority with these simple tips.

 

Eat mindfully

While it can be easy to get carried away with holiday eating, make sure to balance your plate with whole foods, fruits and vegetables. A diet full of fresh fruits and vegetables are linked to decreasing your risk of early age onset colorectal cancer and shouldn’t full off of your plate during the holidays. There’s nothing wrong with treating yourself with a few sweets, but make sure to balance the rest of your meal.

 

Stay hydrated

The holiday season often brings copious amounts of alcohol. Try limiting yourself to only having a glass or two a night. Alcohol has links to colon and rectal cancer, so make sure to drink in moderation. Make sure to up your water content, too.

 

Stay connected through activities

Consider adding a new family tradition by incorporating activities that get you on your feet. After dinner, go for a walk around your neighborhood with your family or add a few exercises to your evenings while you watch TV together. Find small ways to get moving together while enjoying each other’s company.

 

While you’re focusing on your health this holiday season, also consider giving the gift of life by donating to the Colon Cancer Foundation. Donate today to support colon cancer patients, survivors and the research that helps us understand more about this deadly disease.

 

If you’re in New York City this upcoming week, join the Colon Cancer Foundation for our 2019 Ride for Research. We’ll be clipping in for a Charity Spin Class that will benefit our work to help eradicate colon cancer and support survivors and patients.

In the United States, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and in women, according to the American Cancer Society. When you combine men and women, it’s the second most common cause of cancer deaths. An estimated 51,020 people will die in 2019 from colon cancer.

The Young Leadership Board (YLB) of the Colon Cancer Foundation partnering with SWERVE Fitness on Dec. 7, 2019, to offer the charity spin class at either 12:30 p.m. or 1:30 p.m. Tickets are $65 and will include the 45-minute spin class, shoe rental and a bottle of water. The address is at 21 West 46th Street, New York, NY.

All proceeds will be donated directly to the Colon Cancer Foundation, which helps fund research focused on early age onset of colorectal cancer. Learn more about our research program and past grant awardees on our website.

Since the American Cancer Society reduced its screening guidelines for colorectal cancer, it’s no surprise that more young adults are affected by early age onset colon cancer. What is surprising, and just as alarming, is that more young adults are dying from colorectal cancer.

According to the American Cancer Society, the United States has seen a 51% increase in colorectal cancer in those under 50-years-old since 1994. The American Cancer Society reduced its screening guidelines for those at standard risk to 45-years-old because of the rise in early age onset colorectal cancer.

Despite the change in screening standards, mortality rates are increasing for those with early age onset colorectal cancer. According to Colorectal Cancer Alliance research, 67% of young early age onset colorectal cancer patients saw anywhere from two to four doctors before being diagnosed. This means that many patients were slow to recognize their symptoms, which can aid in early detection. 

Early symptoms may include: 

  • A change your bowel habits
  • Diarrhea and constipation
  • Frequent gas, bloating or cramps

 

Learn more about the common symptoms of colorectal cancer and educate your loved ones on how to get screened on our blog. If you have any questions, please reach out to us in the comments.

 

Have you heard of Giving Tuesday before? It’s the perfect time to show your support for the Colon Cancer Foundation by making a quick and easy donation. Giving Tuesday occurs on the Thursday after Thanksgiving, which means it lands on Dec. 3, 2019, this year. Join the millions of Americans across the country who are showing support for the communities they care about by donating on Giving Tuesday.

 

Why should I donate on Giving Tuesday?

The Colon Cancer Foundation values your time, so we made it easy for you to donate and show your support for colon cancer patients and their families. When you donate through Facebook, 100% of the donations made through Facebook Payments go directly to the Colon Cancer Foundation.

 

How do I donate on Giving Tuesday?

To donate on Giving Tuesday, visit our Facebook page on Dec. 3, 2019. There will be an easy to spot button that will direct you to make a donation. You can also send us a private message if you would like any assistance. Make sure to donate through Facebook on Giving Tuesday to take advantage of Facebook’s match.

 

How else can I show my support for the Colon Cancer Foundation on Giving Tuesday?

We understand that donating may not be the best way to show your support. There are multiple ways to show your support on Giving Tuesday. Make sure to share the Colon Cancer Foundation’s social media posts online and tell your friends about the match. For other volunteer opportunities, please contact us at info@coloncancerchallenge.org or (914) 305-6674.

 

Friends, peers and patients gathered at the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) 2019 annual meeting in Baltimore to remember the late Thomas Weber, MD, FACS founder and president of the Colon Cancer Foundation and past chairman of the NCCRT.

Attendees emphasized the importance of honoring Dr. Weber’s legacy by accepting his challenge to continue to ask the difficult questions and listen to every idea, even if these ideas are, as one attendee put it, “very bold.”  A patient-advocate spoke of Tom’s friendship and how she felt especially valued by him and his dedication to the emerging early-age CRC public health issue.

The Colon Cancer Foundation will continue Dr. Weber’s groundbreaking work and by welcoming his son, Nicholas Weber to the Board of Directors, will hold true to his vision and renew his commitment to continue the Colon Cancer Foundation’s national leadership in EAO-CRC.

 

“Finding Faith and Hope” – Recognizing National Caregiver Month

My name is Nadya and I would like to share my story with you with the hope that I can spread awareness of early onset colon cancer and the critical role caregivers play in a patient’s cancer journey.

I am in the process of writing a book which I hope to publish. It is called Finding Faith and Hope. The title comes from my name and that of my sister Vera. My sister’s name in Russian means faith and my name means hope.

The book will tell the story of how we “found” each other through the same orphanage, grew up as friends not knowing we were sisters, were adopted by the same parents, and went on to live wonderful lives together as sisters and best friends. To this day I remain hopeful that I will honor Vera with a long, wonderful life.

I first met my twin sister Vera at an orphanage in St. Petersburg, Russia. Surprisingly we did not know we were sisters. We were adopted at the age of 5 years old and moved to the States with our loving family.

Vera was just 25 years old when she was diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer on April 20, 2015. She had shown a few signs of symptoms: abdominal pain, bloating and blood in her stool. After several months of tests to rule out other diseases and cancers they ended up finding two liters of fluids in her stomach and determined her devastating diagnosis. We all thought it was a horrible dream, when in reality it was not. Her official diagnosis was signet ring cell cancer. Vera fought through her last days. Her courageous heart gave it all she had. After just eight months she passed away peacefully on December 29, 2015. She was 26 years old.

The overall experience of being a caregiver is a tough one to handle at any age but when you are so young it is very tough. Vera had her whole life ahead of her and that’s what really hit me and continues to affect me, even today. I remember my sister being diagnosed like it was yesterday. Being a twin and having one twin diagnosed at such a young age, you feel a bit guilty that it happened to your other half. We were in shock as a family and I had a roller coaster of emotions to deal with as well as a deep fear that I had colon cancer too. I did get tested and I was okay.

Despite the fact that our story does not have a happy ending, there were many good times we shared during those months of Vera’s illness. Being twins you have a special bond and can’t really get any closer but we did get even closer throughout her journey and it brought out the best in me. I was always there to support her even on my worst days. We had an agreement that I would never visit her on bad days in the hospital because she didn’t want me to feel bad. I think that’s a huge part of why I did so well through her journey because most people would drop their lives to help. Vera wanted me to take care of myself as well as I took care of her. I know my sister didn’t want me to stop going to work, nannying, and coaching. Coaching kept me going through this very difficult time. It was a good distraction that my family and friends could participate in. We played soccer, our favorite sport, together when Vera could still play, and that was a great outlet for all of us.

As a caregiver I made sure that my sister had whatever she needed, whether she just needed a chat, a simple fast food meal, to play soccer, or a car ride to blast her music, I was there. I was her rock, her happy twin when she had some of her worst days, and that’s the best part about being a twin. You always have someone there for you. On the other hand, it was tough for me to be there for her and stay positive and composed – because it’s tough to witness your loved one’s painful journey – but you make the best out of it. That is what some people do realize and do not realize, sometimes it’s the caregiver who has the toughest spot in the situation. However, I did feel I had an incredible amount of support and I still feel that way to this day.

Looking back I know going through the loss of my sister was and is tough especially with the outcome we had.Vera was a beautiful person inside and out. Her personality was amazing. She was so strong throughout her journey. I cannot tell you how proud I was of her.

The loss of someone so special hurts you forever but I know she would want me to live for her and be happy. I’ve raised thousands of dollars for organizations like the Colon Cancer Foundation, the Colon Cancer Alliance, and Cancer Care in honor of her courage.

I continue to share her memories, her essence, and her story. I have shared her story in as many ways as possible including appearances on local television stations. The two most critical points that I want to communicate are the following:

1) Cancer does not discriminate in age. If you have the signs, go get checked.

2) You are not alone. I am not alone and together we will fight this disease until there is a cure.

 

 

With the recent announcement of lowering the standard screening age to 45-years-old, it’s no surprise that colon cancer is on the rise among young adults in developed countries. Despite rates decreasing in older adults  due to increased screening, early-age onset colorectal cancer continues to affect Americans nationwide.

According to the study, colon cancer rates remained the same in 14 countries, fell in three countries and rose in 19 countries. Italy, Austria and Lithuania were the only countries to see a decrease in colon cancer rates among those under 50-years-old.

In America, and most of the other 19 countries were colon cancer rates increased, researchers indicated that the increase in diagnoses occurred in the mid 1990s. While there is no specific reason indicated in the study for the increase, many scientists agree that lifestyle choices often play a role in developing colon cancer. Increasing your exercise and reducing processed meat may decrease your chance of developing cancer.

However, the best thing that you can do is make sure that you get screened and encourage your loved ones too. If you are concerned about you or a loved one developing colon cancer, learn more about early-onset colon cancer. You should get screened at 45-years-old if you have an average risk and earlier if you have a family history of colorectal cancer.

For more information on early-age onset colorectal cancer, please reach out to us at info@coloncancerchallenge.org or (914) 305-6674.

 

A recent study has linked past fitness habits and current physical activity to a lower risk of colorectal cancer. The research shows promising insight into more ways that you can lower your personal risk of developing one of the deadliest cancers.

Study participants who had at least an hour of physical activity a day from age 12 to 22 had a lower risk of adenoma by 7%. Adenoma are polyps that are often used as a prerequisite to colon cancer. Those who started having more physical exercise in their adult lives were able to reduce their adenoma by 9%. Participants in the group who maintained activity from their childhood to their adult lives reduced their risk by 24%.

The study shows that it’s never too late to start exercising because it can have a cumulative effect on your health. Start upping the physical activity in your life by walking a few times a week and building up to more rigorous cardiovascular exercise:

  • Swimming
  • Running
  • Hiking
  • Rowing
  • Cycling
  • Cross-country skiing

Find an exercise that you enjoy doing and incorporate it into your everyday life to reduce your risk of colon cancer. Your health, and your family, will thank you.

Stayed up-to-date on other colorectal cancer news and research with the Colon Cancer Foundation blog.