PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE

EAO CRC SUMMIT 2019

Thursday, May 2, 2019, 7:30 am – 5:00 pm 
Friday, May 3, 2018, 7:30 am – 12:00 pm

1st Annual Colorectal Cancer Heroes event to be held Thursday evening

New York, NY 

Performing a Knowledge GAP Analysis and
Building a Strategic “Action Plan” to Reduce EAO-CRC Incidence & Mortality

 

SCHEDULE

AVAILABLE IN PDF FORMAT SHORTLY

Thursday, May 2, 2019 8:00 AM FRAMING THE CONVERSATION: STRATEGIC CHALLENGES IN CURRENT MEDICAL CARE THAT CONTRIBUTE TO YOUNG ADULT COLORECTAL CANCER (CRC) INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY.
Thursday, May 2 SESSION I: THE DIMENSIONS OF THE EAO-CRC PROBLEM: TARGET ITEM: ACCURATE, REGULAR, UP TO DATE MEASUREMENT OF KEY METRICS DESCRIBING THE EARLY AGE ONSET COLORECTAL CANCER PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS.
Thursday, May 2 SESSION II: FAMILY HISTORY ASCERTAINMENT IN THE U.S. (ADDRESSING GAP 1) WHAT STEPS ARE NEEDED TO IMPROVE THE WELL DOCUMENTED LESS THAN OPTIMAL STATUS OF THIS SITUATION? WHAT IS OUR BEST INFORMATION ON THE DOCUMENTATION OF CANCER FAMILY HISTORY IN PRIMARY CARE? WHAT ARE THE KEY ELEMENTS REQUIRED FOR SUCCESS.
Thursday, May 2
SESSION III: EARLIEST POSSIBLE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT THROUGH TIMELY RECOGNITION OF THE SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS OF YOUNG ADULT CRC (ADDRESSING GAP 2)
Thursday, May 2 SESSION IV: TIMELY, EFFECTIVE, QUALITY OF LIFE & FERTILITY PRESERVING STATE OF THE ART TREATMENT (ADDRESSING GAP 3)
Thursday, May 2SESSION V: HOW DID THIS HAPPEN? INVESTIGATING THE CAUSES OF EARLY ONSET COLORECTAL CANCERS (EAO-CRC) (ADDRESSING GAP 4)
Friday, May 3SESSION VI: PALLIATIVE CARE: WHY EARLY IS BEST. (INCLUDING GUIDANCE, SUPPORT AND RESOURCES TO PATIENTS AND CAREGIVERS DURING THEIR TREATMENT JOURNEY/CONTINUUM OF CARE. (ADDRESSING GAP 5)
Friday, May 4SESSION VII: EPIGENETICS AND ITS FUTURE ROLE IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INDIVIDUALS MORE SPECIFICALLY AND ACCURATELY
Friday, May 4 CLOSING REMARKS INCLUDING POSTER SESSION AWARD PRESENTATIONS

CO-CHAIRS

Thomas K. Weber MD FACS

Course Director and Host

Director of Surgical Oncology; Northwest Region at Northwell Health Founder and President, Colon Cancer Foundation

Wasif Saef, MD

Course Co-Director

Founder, Raymond Foundation
Founding Co-Chair, GI Cancers Alliance

Susan K. Peterson PhD MPH

Poster Session Committee Chairperson

Professor of Behavioral Science
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This event will bring together leading clinicians, scientists as well as early age onset (EAO) colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors and caregivers from across the country and internationally . The program will provide extensive opportunities for participants to advance their understanding of the rapidly increasing incidence of rectal and colon cancer among young adults under 50 years of age in the U.S. and abroad.

This groundbreaking program will, for a fifth consecutive year, provide all participants the opportunity to hear from and question leading clinicians and researchers on the life saving potential of timely clinical risk assessment/family cancer health history; earliest possible stage diagnosis, optimal, fertility preserving clinical care, as well as the latest information regarding national and international EAO-CRC incidence trends, pathogenesis, and genetics. In addition, this year’s program will present a “Research in Progress” segment featuring currently NCI funded and planned EAO CRC research  projects from across America and Europe. Again this year, important Break-Out Sessions based on needs-assessments from our survivor community will address challenging issues surrounding Palliative Care, support networks for “Caregivers” and a “Primer” on the “Epigenetics” of EAO-CRC specifically requested by our Young Adult CRC Survivor Program Advisory Group.

The course will include lectures, workshops and panel discussions designed to advance the “state-of-the-science” addressing EAO-CRC. Our faculty will once again be world class speakers representing leading academic medical centers with major additional inspiring programmatic contributions from the Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Survivor Community of the United States and beyond.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  • Provide an expert review of the latest published information on the increasing incidence and mortality associated with Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer in the United States and globally.
  • Review the State-of-the-Science regarding the known and possible causes of the increasing incidence of EAO-CRC including alterations in our food and water supply, the contribution of novel germline genetic factors and etiologic clues based on the molecular biology of EAO-CRC cancers.
  • Provide an evidence-based framework for reducing risk, increasing early stage diagnosis and improving treatment and outcomes for young adult colorectal cancer patients.
  • Define the “Gaps” in our current understanding of Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer in order to set our clinical and research priorities and develop a strategic plan to reduce EAO-CRC incidence and mortality

PLANNED PRESENTATIONS AND INVITED FACULTY INCLUDE

DOWNLOADABLE PDF COMING SOON

FRAMING THE CONVERSATION: STRATEGIC CHALLENGES IN CURRENT MEDICAL CARE THAT CONTRIBUTE TO YOUNG ADULT COLORECTAL CANCER (CRC) INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY. SURVIVOR TESTIMONIALS UNDERSCORE OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT IN THE PREVENTION AND CARE OF YOUNG ADULT COLORECTAL CANCER.

Opening Remarks: Richard R. Barakat, MD, Northwell Health Cancer Insititute

Moderated By: Thomas K. Weber, MD, FACS, Northwell Health, Colon Cancer Foundation

SESSION I: THE DIMENSIONS OF THE EAO-CRC PROBLEM: TARGET ITEM: ACCURATE, REGULAR, UP TO DATE MEASUREMENT OF KEY METRICS DESCRIBING THE EARLY AGE ONSET COLORECTAL CANCER PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS.

  • Overview of Global EAO-CRC Incidence Patterns and Trends

Thomas K. Weber, MD, FACS, Northwell Health, Colon Cancer Foundation

  • Overview of United States EAO-CRC Incidence Patterns and  Trends

Rebecca L. Siegel, MPH, American Cancer Society

  • Innovations in Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Cancer Registry Data Accrual in the Age of Genomic Medicine

Jordan Karlitz, MD, FACG Tulane University School of Medicine

  • Overview of European Cancer Registries Data Resources on EAO-CRC  

Irit Ben-Aharon, MD, PhD, Ranbam Health Care Campus, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EOCRT)

SESSION 1: FAMILY HISTORY ASCERTAINMENT IN THE U.S. (ADDRESSING  GAP 1) WHAT STEPS ARE NEEDED TO IMPROVE THE WELL DOCUMENTED LESS THAN OPTIMAL STATUS OF THIS SITUATION? WHAT IS OUR BEST INFORMATION ON THE DOCUMENTATION OF CANCER FAMILY HISTORY IN PRIMARY CARE?  WHAT ARE THE KEY ELEMENTS REQUIRED FOR SUCCESS.

Moderator: Gregory Feero, MD, PhD, Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine

  • How and Why the Electronic Health Records (EHR) have failed? An objective professional assessment of where the problems lie. What 21st century “work arounds” do we have to help us address Family Health History documentation, interpretation and appropriate action?
  • Review of National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) Family Health History Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer (EAO-CRC) Group Progress

Dennis Ahnen, MD, AGAF, FACG, University of COlorado School of Medicine Co-Chair National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) Family History  Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Task Group

Heather Hampel, MS, LGC, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Co-Chair National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) Family History Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Task Group

Steven H. Itzkowitz MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Co-Chair National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) Family History  Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Task Group

  • Implementation of the The NCCRT Risk Assessment and Screening Toolkit to Detect Familial, Hereditary and Early Onset Colorectal Cancer

Caleb Lavell, American Cancer Society, Program Manager National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT)

Emily Edelman MS, CGC The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine

  • Strategies for Addressing Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer (An NCCRT Report)

Jan Lowry, PhD, University of Colorado School of Public Health

  • Detecting Unaffected Individuals with Lynch Syndrome (DUAL).  

Sayoni Lahiri, MS, CGC, UT Southwestern Medical Center

  • Large Adenoma Prevalence and Family Health History Documentation

Christine Louise S. Molmenti, MPH. PhD Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health

  • The Future: What needs to be done and how are we going to do it?
    • Integrating content re: Family Health History Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer into the entire continuum of medical and specialty education from medical school through Board Certification, CME and Recertification.
    • Cancer Family History as a Quality Assurance (QA) assessment and “regulatory” U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issue?

Gregory Feero, MD, PhD, Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine

SESSION II: EARLIEST POSSIBLE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT THROUGH TIMELY RECOGNITION OF THE SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS OF YOUNG ADULT CRC (ADDRESSING GAP 2)

Moderator: Whitney Jones, MD, Midwest Gastroenterology Associates

  • A review of the published data supporting delays in diagnosis and the consequences in terms of later stage diagnosis and poorer outcomes
  • Overview of the continuum of providers who interact with patients prior to and up to a diagnosis

Chelsea Boet, MD, Spectrum Health Medical Group

  • Introduction of the EAO-CRC Clinical Alert and Signs and Symptoms Index
    • Provider Education Outreach Initiatives
    • Patient Awareness and Advocacy Initiatives

Andrew Albert, MD, MPH, Chicago Gastro LLC.

Erin Peterson, Colon Cancer Coalition

SESSION III: TIMELY, EFFECTIVE, QUALITY

OF LIFE & FERTILITY PRESERVING STATE OF THE ART TREATMENT (ADDRESSING GAP 3)  

  • Updates in Medical Oncology

Andrea Cercek, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

  • Updates in Rectal Cancer Surgery for Young Adults

Jonathan Mitchem, MD, University of Missouri School of Medicine

  • Optimal Preservation of Fertility

Nicole Noyes MD, Reproductive Endocrinologist, Northwell Health

  • New, Available Treatments for Mismatch repair (MMR) deficient and MSS metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Cathy Eng, MD, FACP, FASCO, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

  • Update on advances in immunotherapy: What new treatments are in the pipeline?

Wasif Saif, MD, Tufts University Medical Center

  • New, relevant, open for accrual clinical trials

Wasif Saif, MD, Tufts University Medical Center

  • GAPS in providing Palliative Care and the cost benefit ratio for hospital systems

James T. D’Olimpio, MD, FACP, FAAHPM North Shore University Hospital

  • Key elements of a Center for Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer

Andrea Cercek, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Zsophia K. Stadler, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Zana Correa, NP, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Stacy Hurt, MHA, MBA, Colon Cancer Coalition

SESSION IV: HOW DID THIS HAPPEN? INVESTIGATING THE CAUSES OF EARLY ONSET COLORECTAL CANCERS (EAO-CRC) (ADDRESSING GAP 4)

  • The Genetics of Heritable CRC: What’s New and Important to Know Regarding the Genetics of EAO-CRC?

Heather Hampel, MS, LGC, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center

Noah Kauff, MD, Duke Cancer Center

Xavier Llor, MD, PhD, Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program. Yale New Haven Hospital

Elena Stoffel, MD, University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center

Zsophia Stadler, MD, The Kenneth Offit Lab | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Mathew B. Yurgelun MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School

  • What is driving the increases in EAO-CRC,  80 plus percent of which is NOT related to the named hereditary syndromes?   
  • The Usual Suspects : New Data – Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Obesity Study  

Yin Cao, MPH, ScD, MPH, Washington University School of Medicine

Semir Beyaz, PhD, Harvard University

  • New Research Information: Current Efforts to investigate the causes of increases in MSS CRC among young adults.
      • The United States:
        • Current NCI Funded Investigations into the Causes of Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer:
          • Colorectal Cancer Risks in People < 50 Years of Age  NIH Small Grant Program (RO3): Epidemiology
            • Richard Hayes, DDS, PhD, MPH, The Cancer Institute at NYU Langone
          • Integrating Diet, Lifestyle and Tumor Tissue Molecular Subtyping to Study the Role of Adolescent Calcium Intake on the Risk of Early Onset Colorectal Neoplasia (R21)
            • Kana Wu,MD, PhD, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Dana-Farber, Harvard Cancer Center
      • The European Union: Funded Investigations
          • European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC): Young Onset CRC: Causation, Treatment and Outcomes
            • Irit Ben-Aharon, MD, PhD, EOCRT European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer
          • University of Madrid: Young Onset CRC in Spain and Italy: A Collaborative Study of the Biology of Young Onset CRC  
            • Jose Perea, MD, PhD, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz University Hospital
      • Studies in Development:
        • CRAYON: ColoRectal Cancer in Adults at Young ONset: New York City Based Prospective Accrual Study of Young Onset Colorectal Cancer: Beyond the Usual Suspects; Asking NEW Questions : Dissecting the Carcinogenic Exposome of the 20th Century : “What, When & Where”
          • Steven H. Itzkowitz MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
          • Thomas F. Imperiale, MD, Regenstrief Institute, Inc., Indiana University Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research, Indiana University School of Medicine
        • An National Institutes of Health (NIH) Funded State of the Science “Huddle”
          • Thomas K. Weber, MD, FACS, Northwell Health

SESSION V: PALLIATIVE CARE: WHY IT SHOULD BE EARLY. (INCLUDING GUIDANCE, SUPPORT AND RESOURCES TO PATIENTS AND THEIR CAREGIVERS DURING THEIR TREATMENT JOURNEY/CONTINUUM OF CARE.  (ADDRESSING GAP 5)

James T. D’OPimpio, MD, FACP, FAAHPM, North Shore University Hospital

Sarah Debord, Colon Cancer Coalition

Andy, Esh, MD, MBA, Palliative Care and Survivorship of Western New York

Krista Nelson, LCSW, OSW-C, BCD, FAOSW, Association of Oncology Social Work

SESSION VI: EPIGENETICS AND ITS FUTURE ROLE IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INDIVIDUALS MORE SPECIFICALLY AND ACCURATELY

Moderator: C. Richard Boland, MD, AGAF, UC San Diego

ACCOMMODATIONS

Please check back. The Colon Cancer Foundation will reserve a block of rooms as close to the venue as possible. 

Hotels in Midtown Manhattan

Hilton Garden Inn Hotel – Central Park South

237 W 54th St, New York, NY 10019

3.5 stars;  average room price – $289

http://www.hgicentralparknyhotel.com/#gref

Phone:(212) 253-6000

Courtyard Marriott – Central Park

1717 Broadway, New York, NY 10019  (Bet. 54th & 55th Street)

3.5 stars; average room price – $289

http://www.marriott.com/hotels/hotel-photos/nycpk-courtyard-new-york-manhattan-central-park/

Phone:  (212) 324-3773

Residence Inn – Marriott-Central Park

1717 Broadway, New York, NY 10019  (Bet. 54th & 55th Street)

3.5 Stars;  Average room price – $289

http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/nycpr-residence-inn-new-york-manhattan-central-park/

Phone:(212) 324-3774

Quin Hotel

101 West 57th Street at Sixth Avenue, New York, NY 10019

4.5 Stars:  Average room price – $250

http://www.thequinhotel.com/

Phone:  (212) 245-7846

Parker New York

119 W 56th St, New York, NY 10019

4 Stars:  Average room price $270

http://www.parkernewyork.com/home/

Phone:(212) 245-5000

Salisbury Hotel

123 W 57th St, New York, NY 10019

3 Stars;  Average room price $200

http://www.nycsalisbury.com/

Phone:(212) 246-1300

PARKING

There are many parking garages and lots in Midtown Manhattan. Please visit the three websites below for a thorough listing and assistance in pre paying for a reservation.

TRANSPORTATION

EMPIRE CLS WORLDWIDE CHAUFFEURED SERVICES

Transportation service from NYC airports is provided through Empire CLS Worldwide Chauffeured Services. Pricing can be viewed HERE.

SUPER SHUTTLE 

Super Shuttle serves John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia Airport (LGA), Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR), Long Island MacArthur Airport (ISP) and the surrounding areas.

Choose from:

  • Non-stop service (direct service from pickup to drop off, no stops)
  • Shared-ride (share the ride with others travelling in the same direction, may include stops)
  • Premium (private, chauffeured sedan or SUV service)

NYC TAXI

Alternatively there is a taxi stand at each NYC airport terminal.  Taxis from LGA are roughly $50.  From JFK they are a flat rate of $52 plus tolls and tip (About $65-$70 total). And from Newark (EWR) roughly $90-95.

UBER  

Uber picks up from all three airports as well and an “Uber X” would cost roughly the same amount as a taxi. The Uber app can be downloaded HERE.

INVITED FACULTY

This year the Summit will feature presentations from EAO-CRC survivors, caregivers clinicians from the nation’s leading cancer centers, and representatives of CRC advocacy organizations including American Cancer Society, Association of Oncology Social Work, The Cancer Institute at NYU Langone, Chicago Gastro LLC., Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, Columbia University, Colon Cancer Coalition, Colon Cancer Prevention Project, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Duke Cancer Center, Harvard Cancer Institute, Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, European Orgnisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EOCRT), Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz University Hospital, Georgia State University, Harvard Medical School, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai Hospital, Indiana University School of Medicine, Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Kaiser Permanente, Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, The Kenneth Offit Lab, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Michael’s Mission, Midwest Gastroenterology Associates, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT), the Never Too Young Coalition, New York Presbyterian/Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York Citywide Colon Cancer Control Coalition, New York University School of Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Northwell Health, Northwell Health Cancer Institute, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Palliative Care and Survivorship of Western New York, Ranbam Health Care Campus, Regenstrief Institute, Inc., Spectrum Health Medical Group, Tufts University Medical Center, Tulane University School of Medicine, University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital, University of Colorado School of Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, UCSD School of Medicine – San Diego, University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center,University of Missouri School of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, World Health Organization, Yale New Haven Hospital.
Dennis J. Ahnen MD AGAF FACGUniversity of Colorado School of Medicine
Andrew Albert, MD, MPH
Chicago Gastro, LLC
Richard Barakat, MD
Physician-in-Chief and Director, Northwell Cancer Institute
Irit Ben-Aharon, M, PhD
Ranbam Health Care Campus, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EOCRT)
Semir Beyaz, PhD
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories
Chelsea Boet, MD
Spectrum health Medical Group
C. Richard Boland MD AGAFUCSD School of Medicine, San Diego
Anne CarlsonColon Cancer Coalition
Yin Cao, MPH, ScD, MPH
Washington University School of Medicine
Andrew Cercek, MD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Zana Correa, NP
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
James T. D’Olimpio, MD, FACP, FAAHPM
North Shore University Hospital
Sarah DebordColon Cancer Coalition
Emily Edelman, MS, CGCThe Jackson Laboratory
Cathy Eng, MD, FACP, FASCO
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Andy Eshe, MD, MBA
Palliative Care and survivorship of Western New York
Greg Feero, MD
National Human Genome Research Institute
Heather Hampel MS LGCThe Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center
Richard Hayes, DDS, PhD, MPH
The Cancer Insitute at NYU Langone

Stacy Hurt, MHA, MBAColon Cancer Coalition
Steven H. Itzkowitz, MD
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Whitney Jones MDMidwest Gastroenterology Associates, Colon Cancer Prevention Project

Jordan Karlitz, MD, FACG
Tulane University School of Medicine
Noah Kauff, MD
Duke Cancer Center
Maureen Killackey, MDNew York Presbyterian/Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
Sayoni Lahiri, MS, CGC
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Caleb LevellNational Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, American Cancer Society
Xavier Llor, MD, PhD
Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program, Yale New Haven Hospital
Jan Lowry, PhD, MPH
Colorado School of Public Health
Jonathan Mitchem, MD
University of Missouri School of Medicine
Christine Louise S. Molmenti PhDFeinstein Institute for Medical Research, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
Krista Nelson, LCSW, OSW-C, BCD, FAOSW
Association of Oncology Social Work
Nicole Noyes, MD
Northwell Health
Jose’ Perea MD PhDFundacion Jimenez Diaz University Hospital
Erin Peterson
Colon Cancer Coalition
Susan Peterson PhD, MPH The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Wasif Said, MD
Tufts University Medical Center
Rebecca L. Siegel, MPHAmerican Cancer Society
Zsophia Stadler MDMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, The Kenneth Offit Lab
Elena Stoffel, MD
University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center
Thomas K. Weber MD FACSDirector of Surgical Oncology; Northwest Region at Northwell Health
Mathew B. Yurgelun, MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Insitute, Harvard Medical School
Kana Wu, MD, PhD, MPH
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School

SPONSORS

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

The sponsors of the EAO-CRC Summit make it possible for us to build public awareness of colorectal cancer (CRC) including hereditary colorectal cancer and the importance of timely screening and prevention.  Their support also allows us to help sponsor prevention programs in New York City including screening efforts for the uninsured and innovative translational research projects focused on early age onset of colorectal cancer.

As a sponsor of the Summit you have the opportunity to reach thousands who join us each year to raise awareness of this deadly and yet preventable disease.

We are pleased to announce our partnership with CURE magazine to organize and host the nation’s first Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Heroes Award Event in conjunction with the Summit. The CRC Heroes event will recognize and honor those that are making a significant impact in the CRC space including patients, caregivers, nurses, and researchers.

If you are interested in joining our community of Sponsors, please look at our EAO-CRC Summit Corporate Sponsors Opportunities or the CURE Colorectal Cancer Heroes Award Event Sponsor Opportunities. Please contact us at 914.305.6675 with any questions.

CME INFORMATION

CME Accreditation:  This activity will be planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME).

Credit Designation:  TBD 

Certificate of Attendance:  TBD

Disclosure Policy:  The Colon Cancer Foundation adheres to the ACCME’s Standards for Commercial Support. Any individuals in a position to control the content of a CME activity, including faculty, planners, reviewers or others, are required to disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. All relevant conflicts of interest will be resolved prior to the commencement of the activity.

ABSTRACT

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS NOW OPEN

Deadline for submission is February 28, 2019. Accepted posters and authors will be notified by mid-March. 

The EAO-CRC Program Planning Committee invites attendees to submit abstracts for a poster presentation at the fifth annual meeting on May 2-3, 2019.  Abstracts may describe research or programs, and may have been presented elsewhere.

** Please remember to register for the 5th Annual Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Summit before March 30, 2019 to qualify for early bird pricing. REGISTRATION OPENING ON JANUARY 28, 2019

** Please remember to book your hotel. ROOM BLOCK INFORMATION WILL BE AVAILABLE ON OR BEFORE JANUARY 28,2019. 

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Abstracts should be submitted as an MS Word document with the EAO CRC Summit Abstract Submission Form to the following email address:  abstracts@coloncancerfoundation.org. Abstracts should include a title, and name(s) of all author(s) and their institution or organization affiliation.  The name of the presenting author should be underlined.  The body of the abstract should not exceed 350 words.  See below for guidelines specific to the body of research and program abstracts.

Research abstracts.  Abstracts describing scientific research on early age onset colorectal cancer should organize the content using the following subheadings:  Background, Methods, Results, and Conclusions. One data table is permitted per abstract. Illustrations and figures are not permitted. Define all abbreviations. Include the abstract title, full names and institutional affiliations of all authors, and email address of the corresponding author at the top of the abstract. Underline the name of the presenting author. Abstracts must not contain copyrighted material unless permission has been obtained by the author. Indicate at the bottom of the page if the abstract has been presented elsewhere and at what meeting. Submitted abstracts not meeting the above specifications will be returned. Any and all relevant conflicts of interest need to be noted at the bottom of the abstract.

Any questions regarding abstract submission should be directed to abstracts@coloncancerfoundation.org

Program abstracts. Abstracts describing programs focused on any aspect of early age onset colorectal cancer should organize the content using the following subheadings:  Program Objectives, Audience, Program Description, Future Directions.  One table is permitted per abstract.  Illustrations and figures are not permitted. Define all abbreviations. Include the abstract title, full names and institutional affiliations of all authors, and email address of the corresponding author at the top of the abstract. Underline the name of the presenting author. Abstracts must not contain copyrighted material unless permission has been obtained by the author. Indicate at the bottom of the page if the abstract has been presented elsewhere and at what meeting. Submitted abstracts not meeting the above specifications will be returned. Any and all relevant conflicts of interest need to be noted at the bottom of the abstract.

Any questions regarding abstract submission should be directed to abstracts@coloncancerfoundation.org

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION FEE

When submitting an abstract each author should also complete the EAO CRC Summit Abstract Submission Form. There is a $75 non-refundable handling fee for submitting an abstract. Payment must be made by credit card; Visa, MasterCard, and American Express are accepted. Purchase orders and checks will not be accepted. The abstract submission fee does not include registration for the EAO CRC Summit; therefore, all authors planning to attend the Summit must register for the meeting through the Colon Cancer Foundation EAO CRC Summit website.

POSTER PRESENTATION SESSIONS

Poster presentations will provide an opportunity for interchange of ideas between the presenter and EAO CRC Summit attendees in his/her study. The poster should be outlined so the research can be understood without an oral explanation as a poster may also be viewed when the author is not present.

Poster location to be determined. Posters will be easily accessible and available for viewing for the duration of the EAO CRC Summit including a reception to be held on the evening of May 2.

Set-Up: Will take place on Thursday, May 2 at 7:00 AM. Each poster will be assigned a sequential number. Locate your assigned poster board and mount your poster within the time noted on the instructions received once accepted. Pushpins will be provided in the area by the Moderators.

Take-Down: Will take place on Friday, May 3 by 12:30 PM. Please disassemble your posted materials at the end of the EAO CRC Summit. Any materials left on the poster board at the end of the session will be removed and disposed of.

AWARDS AND JUDGING

As part of the abstract review process the poster review committee will identify the top ranking abstracts. The top three abstracts will recognized during the EAO CRC Summit poster session. Awardees will also be recognized during the closing remarks and award ceremony. EAO CRC Summit attendees will also have the opportunity to review posters and vote for the People’s Choice Award.

REGISTRATION WILL OPEN WITHIN THE NEXT TWO WEEKS **Update 12/21.18

Northwell Employee 2 Days (April 26 4:30 – 8:30 PM – Non CME – and April 27 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM)MD/PhD
NPs/Pas/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
200.00
170.00
55.00
55.00
Non – Northwell Employee 2 Days (April 26 4:30 – 8:30 PM – Non CME – and April 27 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM)MD/PhD
NPs/PAs/RNs Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
230.00
200.00
55.00
55.00
Northwell Employee 1 day – April 26, 4:30 PM – 8:30 PM (not for CME) MD/PhDN
Ps/Pas/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
125.00
125.00
40.00
40.00
Non-Northwell Employee 1 day – April 26, 4:30 PM – 8:30 PM (not for CME) MD/PhD
NPs/PAs/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
150.00
150.00
40.00
40.00
Northwell Employee 1 day – April 27, 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM MD/PhD
NPs/Pas/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Studen
150.00
120.00
40.00
40.00
Non – Northwell Employee 1 day – April 27, 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM MD/PhD
NPs/PAs/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
180.00
150.00
40.00
40.00